Advancing Associations

“No one moves the needle quite like Augusta…” | Kevin Flynn

16th May 2019

2018 Ryder Cup Performance Team – Behind the Scenes

16th May 2019

Why Coaching Trips Can Be a Money-Spinner for PGA Professionals

13th May 2019

What Should Golfers Do In the Gym?

15th Apr 2019

PODCAST SPECIAL: #GolfHealthWeek – Dr Roger Hawkes & Dr Andrew Murray, Golf & Health Project

15th Apr 2019

PGAs of Europe Supports ‘pledge and PLAY’ For More Inclusive Golf

11th Apr 2019

Member Country PGAs Gather at Le Golf National for Launch of New PGAs of Europe Project

8th Apr 2019

[Whitepaper] From High Potential to High Performance

8th Apr 2019

U.S. Kids Golf Venice Open Achieves World First for Connecting Golf, Sustainability and the Next Generation

7th Apr 2019

Golf Reduces Stress and Improves Mental Health, Says Leading Expert

6th Apr 2019

PGA of Sweden Workshop With James Sieckmann – Open to All PGA Professionals

3rd Apr 2019

Golf Pride® ALIGN® Technology is now available in rubber, hybrid and cord with addition of the Z-Grip® ALIGN® Grip

2nd Apr 2019

PGAs of Europe Support Golf & Health Week, Highlighting How the Sport Helps Wellbeing

2nd Apr 2019

Creating a Positive Development Environment

29th Mar 2019

EDGA Launches ‘pledge and PLAY’ During Golf and Health Week

29th Mar 2019

Brand From Within

27th Mar 2019

Learning – And How to Do it Better

26th Mar 2019

PODCAST SPECIAL: LPGA Commissioner, Mike Whan

15th Mar 2019

Coaching Tactics: Part 1 – Exploring an ‘Intelligent’ Approach to Improvement

14th Mar 2019

Block v Random Practice: Read, Plan, Do – How to Optimise Your Practice with Motor Learning

11th Mar 2019
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Why Golf Needs Women Players…2 min read

Sue ShapcottAuthor: Sue Shapcott


Posted on: 8th Mar 2019

I believe the golf industry wants to increase female golf participation because it is the right thing to do. Equal participation rates mean that both women and men benefit from the game. However, even if the motivation to drive more women to the game isn’t benevolent, there are pragmatic reasons why the golf industry should care about female golfers…

1. More Customers

The European Golf Course Owners Association (EGCOA) undertook a project that examined the future of European Golf – Vision 20/20. The report suggested that the industry has been short-sighted by ignoring women. Women make up 50% of the population who are potential golfers (https://eur.pe/2I9IUuB).

Women now hold more than 50% of managerial positions and account for over 50% of college graduates. Women are financially independent and will spend money playing golf if golf welcomes them.

2. The World is Changing and Golf Should Too

If golf wants to stay relevant, it needs to change with the times. Golf is more appealing to people, including millennials, when it is diverse.

This argument is made in Sweden’s Vision 50/50 project that aims to equalize the number of men and women playing golf (www.golf.se/klubb-och-anlaggning/vision-50-50). By creating a culture that is equitable and open, not exclusive, golf has a brighter future.

3. Funding

Sport is seen as a force for good that benefits society. Consequently, governments have an interest in sports. Funding of sports now focuses as much on diversifying participation as high performance. Therefore, if golf’s governing bodies want to receive government funding, they must increase female participation in the game.

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There is no question that golf needs women participants. What is less clear is whether women need golf. This topic will be addressed in the next issue. By understanding why golf needs women, and why women need golf, the industry can start breaking down barriers that have discouraged women from playing the game.

Sue ShapcottAuthor: Sue Shapcott
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Sue Shapcott is a member of the British PGA. She is a former Curtis Cup and European Tour Player. Sue moved to the United States in 2000 to work for Hank Haney in Dallas, TX. She has a Master’s degree in Educational Psychology, and a PhD in Education from the University of Bath. Sue’s research explores the role of golf coaches in recreational golfer motivation. She now lives in Madison, WI and owns a golf coaching business that provides golf instruction to public golf courses.