Advancing Associations

Thomas International Join Growing PGAs of Europe Supplier Group

6th Dec 2018

PGA of Botswana and PGA of Nigeria Join PGAs of Europe Membership

5th Dec 2018

Global Consensus for Golf in the Race to Tackle Physical Inactivity

17th Oct 2018

love.golf Crosses Borders to Champion Female Participation in Spain

16th Oct 2018

Why Coaching Trips Can Be a Money-Spinner for PGA Professionals

15th Oct 2018

GolfBox ProPlanner Statistically Proves That Lessons Improve Game Performance

14th Oct 2018

‘Académie PGA’ Brings PGA Professional Expertise to Ryder Cup Fans

1st Oct 2018

The R&A and USGA to Engage Global Golf Community in Distance Insights Project

19th Sep 2018

Maintaining the Most Important Members…

6th Sep 2018

The Big Golf Pride Regripping Survey Goes Live

6th Sep 2018

Sean Foley – Coaching Philosophy, Justin Rose, and the Sacrifices Coaches Make for Tour Life…

5th Sep 2018

US Kids Venice Open Brings Sustainability To Young Golfers

21st Aug 2018

Europe Announces Team for Junior Ryder Cup

21st Aug 2018

Jamie Gough (PGA of South Africa) – 2018 Open Championship

21st Jul 2018

The PGAs of Europe and love.golf Unite to Grow Female Participation Across Europe

2nd Jul 2018

PGAs of Europe Launch Travel Club in Partnership With Golf Escapes

13th May 2018

Myth-Busting GDPR for the Golf Industry

12th May 2018

Member Country Spotlight: PGA of Hungary

18th Apr 2018

Get Into Golf – A Campaign for the Modern Millennial

18th Apr 2018

#FalconerForeGolf: TV & Radio Star, Jenni Falconer, Fronts Latest Female Golf Development Activity from PGAs of Europe

13th Apr 2018
load more

The Value of Storytelling3 min read


Posted on: 11th Mar 2018

We might not always be aware of it, but we tell stories all the time. Whether telling someone what we did over the weekend or explaining how we came up with a certain idea for a project, we use storytelling to share our emotions, experiences and knowledge.

And we have been doing so throughout history. Stories have allowed us to pass on information from one generation to the next in the form of books, visuals and the spoken word. Some cultures rely heavily – or solely in some cases – on oral storytelling to pass on traditions, values and beliefs. Members of the Native American Abenaki tribe, for example, have traditionally told their children stories as a way to teach them right from wrong and so instil core values in them. Fairy tales have done the same for many cultures for hundreds of years.

So why stories? What makes them so valuable?

First and foremost, stories allow us to make sense of the world around us. The way this works is quite simple: our brains are hardwired to look for patterns, i.e. finding links between cause and effect. This is how we learn from a young age. For example, if we touch something very hot and it hurts our hand we make the causal connection between the two and learn not to touch that thing again. The end result of this thought process is a story, which we can then share with others to spread our knowledge.

Stories can touch us in any number of ways. They can open our minds to new perspectives, inspire and persuade us, help build our confidence, grow a sense of inclusion and incite change. Ultimately, they can be used to shape our values and beliefs. Think, for example, of how stories are used within religion and politics to influence how people think and what they believe.

A story’s power comes from its narrative form, which draws us in much more than dry facts ever could. Evidence from neuroscience suggests that when we listen to a story our brain patterns start to mirror those of the speaker, allowing us to connect on a deeper level. The way a story is structured – with a clear beginning, middle and end – also helps to maintain our engagement as we long to hear the outcome.

Being a great storyteller is an incredibly useful skill for any professional to have, and a relatively easy one to master: after all, it’s something that we practise almost every day. However, to perfect the art there are some ground rules to keep in mind:

  1. Make sure you understand your audience and how best to best to engage them.
  2. Your story needs to be easy to follow with a clear structure.
  3. Don’t forget the power of delivery: your tone of voice and body language can influence engagement levels.

Evaluate your own storytelling skills: how comfortable do you feel telling a story? How good do you think you are at engaging others when you speak? Then start practising those skills. Whether it’s at your next networking event, during a presentation, or a meeting with your boss or a hiring manager: tell a story about you, your career or the project you are working on. Chances are whoever’s listening will remember that story over anything else.


This content appears courtesy of Abintegro, experts in career management, transition technology & e-learning for today’s modern, mobile and technology-savvy workforce – Find out more at www.abintegro.com

Credit: Abintegro; The Guardian; The Health Foundation