PGAs of EuropeCareer Development – PGAs of Europe http://www.pgae.com Home of the PGAE Mon, 13 Nov 2017 15:53:38 +0000 en-gb hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.8.3 U.S. Kids Golf Certified Coaches Seminar: 09 November – Hamburg, Germany http://www.pgae.com/news/u-s-kids-golf-certified-coaches-seminar-09-november-hamburg-germany/ Fri, 27 Oct 2017 17:01:49 +0000 U.S. Kids Golf http://www.pgae.com/?p=20330 Register now for the latest U.S. Kids Golf Certified Coaches Seminar on 09 November in Hamburg, Germany...]]>

Registration Opens – Sep 19, 2017

Registration Closes – Nov 09, 2017

Price – $119.00

Participating in a U.S. Kids Golf Certified Coach Seminar enhances the coach’s knowledge of all aspects of youth golf that can be utilized to enhance his/her current program or provide the basis for establishing new offerings. Areas of focus during the seminar include:

Perfect Swings Begin with the Perfect Fit:

The importance of properly-fitted clubs to maximize success for both young golfers and their coaches. Proprietary research on swing speed development for junior golfers.

Scaling the Game:

Research regarding proper length of course setup for players based on their driver carry distance will be provided so that coaches will become experts in golf course setup and yardages. Tailoring the course for young golfers will result in lower scores, encouraging more rounds and increasing retention.

Enhancing Current Junior Programs:

Tools, resources, best practices and bringing “fun” to their junior programs through a games-based curriculum. The seminars will feature an outdoor session that will demonstrate game-based learning with games from the U.S. Kids Golf Book of Games.

Other topics presented in more detail include:

  • Analysis of golf participation and programs vs. other youth sports.
  • “Scaling” of the following elements for youth: Equipment, The Golf Course, Competition and Instruction.
  • Parental involvement and introduction to the “Positive Coaching Alliance”.
  • High-quality instruction focusing on fun and achievement while teaching fundamentals.
  • Introduction to golf-specific games to serve as a key component in instruction.

Completing the Certified Coach process

Certified Coach Frequently Asked Questions

LOCATION – Gut Kaden Golf and Land Club GmbH, Kadener Straße 9 , D-25486 Alveslohe

DATE AND TIME – Thursday, 9 November | 8:15-16:30

HOTEL INFORMATION –  A limited number of rooms are available at Gut Kaden.  Reservations can be made at Gut Kaden.

Click Here to Find Out More About the Seminar – http://eur.pe/2idJSKu

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U.S. Kids Golf Certified Coaches Seminar: 09 November – Hamburg, Germany
“If Disney Ran Your Hospital…The Things You Would Do Differently” http://www.pgae.com/ask/if-disney-ran-your-hospital-the-things-you-would-do-differently/ Fri, 27 Oct 2017 07:00:05 +0000 Tony Bennett http://www.pgae.com/?p=20277 "Author Fred Lee gives his advice on the five behaviours that customers really value in those who provide them with services..."]]>

On my latest read of the thought provoking, “If Disney Ran Your Hospital: 9 1/2 Things You Would Do Differently”, author Fred Lee, gives his advice on the five behaviours that customers value in those who provide them with services.

Fred observes that hospital patients judge their experience not only by the way they are treated for the disease but also, and more importantly, by the way, that they are treated as a person…

If Fred is right, and incidentally I think that he is, and if this concept transfers across into golf, which I think it does, then the ‘how’ is perhaps more important than the ‘what’? This is an essential point for all, coaches, managers, and leaders to recognise. By the way, the great ones do; that is one reason that they are great.

Content, or perhaps we should call it knowledge, can be learned. In fact, content can be learned by almost anyone on almost any subject. Certainly, there is always content to learn or be updated on, that is the nature of progress. Often people have a fascination for content, and yet they have a hard time sharing that knowledge in a way that can make a difference in the life of someone else. I believe that it is possible to learn enough content for whatever role you have in a short period of time to become good at almost any subject. Learning to share that knowledge however is altogether different.

Back to Fred Lee and his five behaviours. Fred conveniently created the acronym S.H.A.R.E. Essentially these behaviours boiled down to the following values: using initiative, being part of a team, understanding the customer’s feelings, treating them with courtesy and making sure that communication is open and honest.

  • S – Sense people’s needs before they ask (initiative)
  • H – Help each other out (teamwork)
  • A – Acknowledge people’s feelings (empathy)
  • R – Respect the dignity and privacy of everyone (courtesy)
  • E – Explain what is happening (communication)

So if the ‘how’ is so important then how can golf focus more on how to share experience and knowledge so that it is relevant, timely and useful? There are many answers to this question, and I would love to hear your thoughts on the subject.

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“If Disney Ran Your Hospital…The Things You Would Do Differently”
Top 10 Practical Tips For Organising Your Job Search http://www.pgae.com/ask/top-10-practical-tips-for-organising-your-job-search/ Mon, 23 Oct 2017 11:00:19 +0000 Coaching4Careers http://www.pgae.com/?p=11017 Like it or not, job hunting in the 21st Century is very much a full-time job. And like any job, it involves proper planning and organisation...]]>

Like it or not, job hunting in the 21st Century is very much a full-time job. And like any job, it involves proper planning and organisation of time and resources.

You need to make sure your efforts are being mirrored in the results you see, which means having a system in place to allow you to understand what’s working and what isn’t. Here are our top 10 tips for a systematic, successful search:

1. Take some time out

Start by giving yourself 24 hours off from your search to create some space in your head to start organising yourself. A small time investment now could save you hours in the long-run.

2. Create a workspace

Having cleared some space in the temporal sense, set aside a room or desk that’s clear and clutter-free. Doing this will automatically make you feel more focused.

3. Clarify your goals

Draw up a list of your main goals: what kind of position do you want, when do you want it by and what salary are you willing to accept? Then have an alternative plan in place for each of the above.

4. Have a set schedule

It’s been said that the difference between a dream and a goal is a deadline. Commit a certain period of each day to working on your applications and stick rigidly to this.

5. Sharpen your search materials

You need to be ready to roll with your application at short notice. This means maintaining an up-to-date CV and cover letter template as well as keeping your professional profile ticking over on sites such as LinkedIn.

6. Soup-up your inbox

The email account is the jobseeker’s command HQ. Sorting your emails into different categories – jobs applied to; open positions etc. – will help you stay on top of things.

7. Create a system

Alongside this, you’ll need a tracking system that lets you know where you are with each application at quick glance. It needn’t be an elaborate spreadsheet, but should have all the information you need clearly laid-out.

8. Then use it

The best data management system in the world is no use to you unless you keep it regularly updated. Make sure your version includes a ‘next step’ section to encourage you to follow up on any developments.

9. Map your networking

Monitoring your informal job enquiries is no less important. Stop trails from going cold by keeping a note of any meetings or encounters you have while setting reminders for when to follow up.

10. Review your progress

Taking stock of your search is more important now than ever. Review what’s been working well and what hasn’t. Then decide how you’re going to improve things.

Job hunting can be a relatively painless business or it can be a long, hard slog. While there are usually a number of factors involved, often some simple organisation and forward planning can prove the difference.


This content appears courtesy of Abintegro, experts in career management, transition technology & e-learning for today’s modern, mobile and technology-savvy workforce – Find out more at www.abintegro.com

Credit: Graduate Fog; Quint Careers; Business Insider

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Top 10 Practical Tips For Organising Your Job Search
PGA Professional Spotlight: Marie Jeffery (PGA of Austria) [PODCAST] http://www.pgae.com/ask/pga-professional-spotlight-marie-jeffery-pga-of-austria-podcast/ Wed, 18 Oct 2017 10:07:43 +0000 PGAs of Europe http://www.pgae.com/?p=20084 Marie Jeffery tells us about how she got into golf, her work in the world of 'Communicology', and her views on female participation and development in golf...]]>

Marie Jeffery is a Member of the PGAs of Europe Golf Development Team and a PGA of Austria Member. We spoke to Marie to find out more about how she got into golf, her work in the world of ‘Communicology’, her experience with the Austrian Girls National Team and views on female participation and development in golf.

“I think women’s golf has a great future if it can market itself correctly. For me it’s as exciting watching a ladies’ tournament as it is watching a men’s tournament. Sometimes people get a bit drawn to how far the ball flies and they attack impossible pins and take on impossible shots, but the ladies play really clever golf too.

“I was at the Evian Championship last year and what I saw was very impressive – they had a very professional attitude and were really focused on the range so there’s no difference between them and the guys. I would like to see ladies get much more TV time and more acknowledgement for what they are doing.”

Interview Highlights:

00:29 – How Marie got into golf…

01:39 – Entering a golf club as a young girl golfer…

02:21 – The changes in golf in Austria…

03:23 – Marie now works at the same facility that she started her golf career at…

06:25 – Being driven by those that originally discouraged her golf…

08:23 – Getting the Austrian National Team Coach job…

09:20 – Becoming involved in ‘Communicology’…

11:25 – Using ‘Communicology’ to break things down and not get lost in the detail…

12:10 – Key learnings from Marie’s career so far…

14:19 – The difference between teaching & coaching…

16:00 – What changes has Marie seen over the time she worked with the Austrian Girls squads…

18:49 – Working as a National Coach is a 24/7 role…

19:41 – What is the future of girls’ golf…

20:48 – The challenges face in women and girls’ participation…

23:01 – The difference between girls and boys’ sport …

24:26 – What are the mistakes most beginner golfers make…?

28:15 – Who is the best lesser-known coach Marie has worked with…?

30:19 – What advice would you give your 25-year-old self…?

31:09 – Marie’s views on who she feels are ‘successful’ people…

32:05 – Marie’s favourite book…

33:01 – The advice has Marie found beneficial up until now…

35:01 – What might surprise listeners about Marie…

35:19 – The golf equipment that gives Marie the most joy…

35:55 – Marie’s dream Fourball…

36:34 – Advice for aspiring PGA Professionals…


Find out more about Marie at www.functionalgolf.at and at functionalgolfat on Facebook.

Find out more about the PGAs of Europe Golf Development Team at http://eur.pe/GolfDevelopmentTeam

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PGA Professional Spotlight: Marie Jeffery (PGA of Austria) [PODCAST]
What Are Intercultural Skills? http://www.pgae.com/ask/what-are-intercultural-skills/ Sun, 08 Oct 2017 15:44:03 +0000 PGAs of Europe http://www.pgae.com/?p=20019 Broadly speaking, intercultural skills are those that describe your ability to effectively communicate with people from different cultural backgrounds...]]>

Broadly speaking, intercultural skills are those that describe your ability to effectively communicate with people from different cultural backgrounds.

On the one hand this pertains to language, i.e. whether or not you speak a second or maybe even a third language. More importantly though, it’s about understanding and accepting that customs, standards, and values differ between cultures, and being willing to learn and adapt to them.

Research undertaken by the British Council showed that employers value intercultural skills just as much as they do formal qualifications. The Council surveyed employers from nine different countries operating within the public, private and non-profit sectors. When asked about their reasons for valuing intercultural skills, they stated that employees who successfully display these skills were more likely to secure new projects, worked better within diverse teams and were more successful in representing the company brand and reputation.

In fact, a lack of intercultural skills was perceived as a risk to the company, possessing the potential to seriously damage client relations, team productivity and ultimately the company’s reputation.

While there might not be a straightforward way for employers to test your intercultural skills in an interview, they might ask you questions like: have you ever worked abroad? Do you have experience working in a diverse team? Do you speak any foreign languages?

They can also learn a great deal from how you communicate throughout the application process and during the interview: are you easy to talk to? Are you able to see things from someone else’s perspective? Are you willing to learn from them?

Ultimately, intercultural skills are something you show. Simply listing it on your CV won’t do; you’ll have to convince people you possess the eagerness to learn and the ability to adapt. So start doing: read, travel, learn a new language, talk to different people and, most importantly, be curious.


This content appears courtesy of Abintegro, experts in career management, transition technology & e-learning for today’s modern, mobile and technology-savvy workforce – Find out more at www.abintegro.com

Credit: British Council; Skills You Need

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What Are Intercultural Skills?
How to Keep Your Brain Sharp http://www.pgae.com/ask/how-to-keep-your-brain-sharp/ Wed, 27 Sep 2017 12:43:11 +0000 Coaching4Careers http://www.pgae.com/?p=12215 Coaching 4 Careers reveal 4 ways you can keep your brain sharp to preserve healthy cognitive function and sharpness across all the right areas...]]>

The brain. The body’s most powerful organ. Only a brain surgeon could fully understand its inner workings or how it does what it does. One thing’s for sure, though: you’ll miss it when it’s gone.

With Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia on the rise, ‘brain-training’ is very much in vogue among retirees and younger whippersnappers alike. As game developers have been quick to appreciate, preserving healthy cognitive function means maintaining sharpness across all the right areas, from memory and recall to problem solving and planning. There’s enough there for a bi-annual upgrade and then some.

Video games aside, there are plenty of equally as efficient but less costly ways to keep your grey matter firing on all cylinders. Here are some top tips for successful cerebral conservation:

1. Learn something new

Be it the cello, Ancient Greek or Chinese calligraphy, teaching yourself a new skill is a great way to keep the old brain cells ticking over. A recent study of retirees showed that a challenging mental activity one a week reduced the risk of dementia by 7%.

2. Get physical

Work the rest of your body while you’re at it. Research suggests that 30 minutes of exercise three times each week can reduce dementia by 40% and cognitive impairment by 60%. The secondary benefits should also be obvious.

3. Food for thought

You don’t need a PHD in nutrition to know some foods are better for the brain than others. Indulge in vegetables, nuts and fish – staples of the Mediterranean diet that promote blood-flow to the brain. Drink plenty of water and stay off the junk food!

4. Take a load off

From catching enough ‘Z’s each night to meditative techniques, giving your brain some much-needed down time is essential in reducing wear and tear. It will also help you maintain skills such as problem solving, concentration and memory. Aim for 7.5 to 8.5 hours a night for optimum brain function.

Whether happily retired or gainfully employed, whatever your age, looking after the stuff upstairs should be a top priority. The good news is that keeping your neurotransmitters nimble needn’t cost the earth and can slot fairly easily into your day-to-day lifestyle.


This content appears courtesy of Abintegro, experts in career management, transition technology & e-learning for today’s modern, mobile and technology-savvy workforce – Find out more at www.abintegro.com

Credit: Forbes; NPR.com; Time

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How to Keep Your Brain Sharp
PGA Professional Spotlight: Alastair Spink (PGA of GB&I) [PODCAST] http://www.pgae.com/ask/pga-professional-spotlight-alastair-spink-pga-of-gbi-podcast/ Mon, 25 Sep 2017 14:45:15 +0000 PGAs of Europe http://www.pgae.com/?p=19589 We speak to PGAs of Europe Golf Development Team Member, Alastair Spink, about his journey as a PGA Pro & how he has become a leader in women's golf development]]>

Alastair Spink is a Member of the PGAs of Europe Golf Development Team and a PGA of GB&I Member. Here we speak to Alastair about his how he made it into golf to eventually become a PGA Pro, along with how he has become a leader in women’s golf development and participation taking an academic approach to his work in creating the hugely successful Love.golf programme.

Interview Highlights:

01:14 – Early beginnings in golf…

04:38 – Alastair’s first golf coach…

07:58 – How has the way Alastair learnt golf shaped his coaching style…

08:48 – Turning Professional…

12:58 – Working at Hintlesham Hall Golf Club in Ipswich…

16:16 – An increased in development and working as a County Golf Development Officer…

22:24 – Taking an interest in gender disparity in clubs and golf in general, creating an interest in women’s golf development…

23:54 – How did Alastair create a women’s participation-led programme…

27:37 – Barriers to developing women’s participation programmes…

29:06 – How will female participation help the industry in general?

30:32 – Learning from the stories and communities developed at ‘Park Runs’…

33:12 – What changes have you seen in golf across your career?

35:00 – What’s the main mistake golfers make when taking up the sport?

37:05 – What would you tell your 25 year old self?

38:57 – Alastair’s favourite books…

39:34 – What might surprise us about Alastair Spink?

40:21 – Alastair’s dream fourball…


Follow Alastair on Twitter at @Thegolfcoach and find out more about Love.Golf at www.love.golf.

Find out more about the PGAs of Europe Golf Development Team at http://eur.pe/GolfDevelopmentTeam

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PGA Professional Spotlight: Alastair Spink (PGA of GB&I) [PODCAST]
The Value to Organisations of Offering Career Support to Staff http://www.pgae.com/ask/the-value-to-organisations-of-offering-career-support-to-staff-2/ Wed, 06 Sep 2017 11:05:52 +0000 Coaching4Careers http://www.pgae.com/?p=19679 With global employment trends changing all the time, the need to keep and develop staff should be at the top of an organisations agenda...]]>

There is little recent data about career management conversations in the workplace:

Kelly Global Workforce Index – August 2014 (230,000 people across 31 countries participated)

  • 57% people agree that career development discussions are beneficial in terms of the opportunity to acquire new skills
  • Only 38% had these discussions with their employer in the past year
  • Only 29% are satisfied with the career development resources provided by their employer

With global employment trends changing all the time, the need to keep and develop staff should be at the top of an organisations agenda.

Whether the organisation is a school, SME, Not for Profit or Corporate, many seem frightened to invest in the career management of their staff, they think staff will be unsettled, leave, or want more than they can offer. Some work very well with their staff, helping them manage their careers and reap the reward. The reality is that staff who feel valued and invested in are more likely to stay with an organisation and be motivated to work harder.


“Managing human capital is a misnomer. Humans are ‘beings’. We want to be known and valued for who we are, and our aspirations and ambitions recognised and seen as important. It’s a missed opportunity for an employer not to attend to these needs and thereby reap the productivity gains that accrue from more motivated, loyal employees”

(Talent, Careers and Organisations, What Next? Corporate Research Forum)

The value an organisation can reap when investing in their staff:

  • Staff are more settled and less distracted as they have plans for their future
  • Organisations can plan their future if they know what their staff want and plan to do
    • Demographics
    • Succession planning
    • Recruitment
    • In house development of staff
  • An organisation planning what will happen with regards to its staff must be more cost effective
  • Fewer surprises
  • Less need for interim, agency or contract staff
  • Better ongoing communication between staff and employer
  • Staff more likely to say if they are looking for a new role
  • Organisation able to deliver a more structured handover if they know a member of staff 
is/wants to leave
  • Employers who cannot afford financial rewards/bonuses, can support the development and 
career management of staff, which can be a cost-effective reward process.

The ability to manage your career and future is a life skill, if organisations don’t invest in their staff to give them these skills, how can they then pass on these skills to the people who work for them and to the next generation who they might educate and/or influence.

There are many processes for managing careers and these can be integrated into a workplace environment, below is a cycle often used to develop process that works within different organisations, depending on what is needed and required by the organisation and their staff.

Often employees find it easier to have these conversations with someone external first.

“My volunteers felt better placed to plan an effective conversation with their manager once they’d been coached, which is a win-win for the organisation”

(T Delamare, An action research study on the barriers facing women developing their careers and how they can be supported using a coaching framework. MA Dissertation, Oxford Brookes University, 2016)

“Internally focused workplace development opportunities are likely to ensure that a particular employer realises investment in development for the organisation. Yet, the worker might not have the skills transferable to other organisations. This is in contrast with the premise of the type of ‘deal’ where enhancement of employability is the key value derived from the employment relationship by the worker. Instead, they may be receiving only the development that is relevant to their current employer, without the promise of job security.”

(CIPD – Attitudes to Employability and Talent, Sept 2016)

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The Value to Organisations of Offering Career Support to Staff
Job Hunting: The Basics In 9 Steps http://www.pgae.com/ask/job-hunting-the-basics-in-9-steps/ Mon, 04 Sep 2017 13:44:35 +0000 Coaching4Careers http://www.pgae.com/?p=14237 Job seeking is tough. Everyone knows that. It's time consuming and it can be gut-wrenchingly disappointing...]]>

Job seeking is tough. Everyone knows that. It’s time consuming and it can be gut-wrenchingly disappointing. Armed with that knowledge we do our very best to avoid it even whilst telling our nearest and dearest that we are “currently looking for a job”. So the first thing to be aware of, if you’re serious about finding a job, is your tendency to procrastinate – just because you’re sitting at a computer doesn’t mean you’re any closer to your dream role. You need to be doing the right things.

Find somewhere to conduct your job search that is free from distractions and then do the following, roughly in this order:

1. Make yourself a realistic job hunting schedule and stick to it

A routine will stop you wasting your day and make your job search as efficient as possible.

2. Sort your CV out

Rework the format so that pertinent skills leap out at you ; create different versions for different roles; use key words often that are in the job descriptions.

3. Create a cover letter template

Convey your fit for the role and how much you want the job; make different versions with wording relevant to each role/employer.

4. Search both large and niche job boards

It’ll give you the biggest variety of job listings. Take advantage of alerts to find out about jobs as soon as they are posted.

5. Organise and professionalise

Ensure your voicemail message and email address are professional; get a list ready of references with relevant details and contact information; create folders for all your files and emails.

6. Use Social Media

Follow specific companies to find out about job openings and the culture of the company; try to track down your interviewers.

7. Check your online presence

Google yourself and check for any inappropriate or inaccurate information; remove or correct anything that would be difficult to explain in an interview.

8. Make good use of LinkedIn

Check for inconsistencies between your CV and your profile; join professional groups; ask for recommendations from your managers; check to see if you’re connected to someone in the industry or the organisations you’re applying to.

9. Prepare for your interview

Research the industry and company; find out about the type of interview you’ll be facing; be able to talk about your skills and back them up with evidence; practise answers to all types of interview questions.

There will be challenges so don’t give up, think positively and manage your own expectations.


This content appears courtesy of Abintegro, experts in career management, transition technology & e-learning for today’s modern, mobile and technology-savvy workforce – Find out more at www.abintegro.com

Credit: Glassdoor; abintegro

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Job Hunting: The Basics In 9 Steps
What Does ‘Investing In Your Career’ Actually Mean? http://www.pgae.com/ask/what-does-investing-in-your-career-actually-mean/ Mon, 26 Jun 2017 15:46:00 +0000 Coaching4Careers http://www.pgae.com/?p=12680 It means you have to spend some time and money on your career. It means taking control of your career and being accountable for your own success.]]>

It means you have to spend some time and money on your career. It means taking control of your career and being accountable for your own success.

Here are some good examples of where you could make more of an investment career-wise:

  1. Build relationships. Create your own circle of influence; find a mentor. Make time to make connections, pay attention to and nurture meaningful relationships.
  2. Do the career management thing: make a plan, devise some goals. Take time to review your objectives and challenge your own commitment levels daily.
  3. Recognise what you are good at and get better at it. Spend time observing yourself and your colleagues in meetings or just day to day and notice what you uniquely bring. Then invest some time and money getting better at it.
  4. Be prepared to take a step backwards. It may be that to move forward long term you need to forego some short term gratification. A lower salary now could mean great things in the future.
  5. Get a qualification/attend a course/learn something new.
  6. Build your online brand. Create a webpage to showcase your work or simply keep your social networking profiles updated and constantly be on the lookout for anything that could be perceived as negative.
  7. Raise your professional profile. Spend time on a committee or board or take on a challenging new project. Find ways to gain valuable, marketable experience.
  8. Ask for feedback. And learn from it.
  9. Take a risk. If you don’t really have to think about risk it probably isn’t the life changing or breakout move you were looking for.
  10. Make time for that which balances you: your family, your friends, your hobbies. They will offer you perspective, different experiences and a much needed escape from the world of work.

If you think about it you probably invest more time and money in your choice of holiday than you do in your career. Given that you spend two-thirds of your waking life at work and your career goes a long way to determining your quality of life, it may be worth reassessing your investment portfolio.

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This content appears courtesy of Abintegro, experts in career management, transition technology & e-learning for today’s modern, mobile and technology-savvy workforce – Find out more at www.abintegro.com

Credit: Forbes; HBR; LinkedInInvestopedia

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What Does ‘Investing In Your Career’ Actually Mean?
Resilience is a Key Career Skill http://www.pgae.com/ask/resilience-is-a-key-career-skill/ Thu, 15 Jun 2017 14:58:51 +0000 PGAs of Europe http://www.pgae.com/?p=19020 Resilience might be way down your 'list of skills to be aware of' if you are job hunting right now, but it is a vital requirement for modern professionals...]]>

Resilience might be way down your ‘list of skills to be aware of’ if you are job hunting right now, but it is a vital requirement for modern professionals.

With job security and a standard career path less and less attainable across many industries, a capacity to handle uncertainty and adversity has never been more important (or in demand).

Such is the case that many employers will try to find out about your resilience through interview questions on how you’ve handled stress, pressure and failure in the past. Additionally, job hunting itself can be an incredibly demoralising experience if you let it. Focussing on building your resilience can make all the difference to your inner confidence and success rate across many areas in your life.

This might be easier said than done though – to achieve resilience means possessing the right blend of self-awareness and inner strength, and the flexibility to adapt to changes in circumstances and surroundings. It’s rather like a palm tree: a strong, firmly rooted base supporting an element that’s far more flexible and able to cope with being blown around by different winds.

Here are three key building blocks that can help you towards developing a resilient professional persona:

1. Positivity

Having a positive view of yourself and the world around you is the basis for developing resilience. Pay attention to the messages you send yourself throughout the day. If you find yourself making negative assumptions about yourself or anything around you, consciously switch to a positive thought. With practice this should become automatic. That will keep you grounded, rooted like a tree, and give you the stability you need for a positive mindset.

2. Commitment

Get to know yourself and recognise what is important to you. Have a clear idea of your future aspirations and where you want to go in your career. You need to be willing to commit to your goals and invest in making them happen. Knowing what is important to you and being committed to your goals strengthens you in your core. Don’t forget however, that even the best-laid plans can sometimes go off course or need to be abandoned altogether. Make like a palm tree and allow yourself flexibility to go with the flow when things don’t go to plan.

3. Control

Control means being aware of the situations or areas in your life you can influence as well as recognising those that you can’t. Being able to distinguish between the two will allow you to focus your energy on the things that are most important or achievable. It will give you the flexibility to prioritise your goals and adapt to different circumstances.

Remember that in order to be resilient you also need to be healthy in mind and body so pay attention to your general well-being, take proper breaks, eat well, and look after the relationships that support you. When it comes to resilience it’s about knowing that you can’t stop the waves, but that you can certainly learn how to surf them.


This content appears courtesy of Abintegro, experts in career management, transition technology & e-learning for today’s modern, mobile and technology-savvy workforce – Find out more at www.abintegro.com

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Resilience is a Key Career Skill
5 Ways to Get MORE Out of Your Work Week w/ Will Robins http://www.pgae.com/ask/5-ways-to-get-more-out-of-your-work-week-w-will-robins/ Thu, 15 Jun 2017 07:03:50 +0000 Golf in the Life of http://www.pgae.com/?p=18943 Will Robins and GolfIntheLifeOf.com discuss some of their favorite mindsets and habits to help you get more out of you day / week / year...]]>

Sometimes it feels like time can just fly by and we’re not really sure what happened or what progress was made. Will Robins and I sat down to talk about some of our favorite mindsets and habits to get more out of a day / week / year.


Subscribe iTunes | Android | RSS

Read the entire story behind this here from James Clear.

Will’s first suggestion – The Ivy Lee Method

  1. At the end of each work day, write down the six most important things you need to accomplish tomorrow. Do not write down more than six tasks.
  2. Prioritize those six items in order of their true importance.
  3. When you arrive tomorrow, concentrate only on the first task. Work until the first task is finished before moving on to the second task.
  4. Approach the rest of your list in the same fashion. At the end of the day, move any unfinished items to a new list of six tasks for the following day.
  5. Repeat this process every working day.

Read the entire story behind this here from James Clear.

The biggest killer of everyone’s day is opening up emails first things in the morning.

Everyone is always asking “how” questions. What really matters is the “why”.

Take some time to improve your business / sales skills if it’s something you struggle with and go outside of the typical education / certifications. Give yourself permission to try some new ideas out with the framing of an experiment or challenge.

3 Morning Questions:

  • What happened yesterday?
  • How do I feel about that?
  • What am I working on today

Will’s past episodes on coaching programs:

Group Coaching Q&A part 1
Group Coaching Q&A part 2
Working with Groups

Links / Resources

Charles M. Schwab productivity story – Ivy Lee Method
2017 Coaching Workshop in Orlando
Will’s Consulting Company RGX
BJ Fogg – Tiny Habits

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5 Ways to Get MORE Out of Your Work Week w/ Will Robins
6 Ways to Find Out Whether a Job Candidate Will Fit Your Company’s Culture http://www.pgae.com/ask/6-ways-to-find-out-whether-a-job-candidate-will-fit-your-companys-culture/ Wed, 14 Jun 2017 12:23:18 +0000 Inc.com http://www.pgae.com/?p=13769 Found an applicant with the right skills? Time for a culture interview. You know that job applicant has the right skills to fill your open position...]]>

Minda Zetlin is a business technology writer and speaker, co-author of The Geek Gap, and former president of the American Society of Journalists and Authors. She lives in Snohomish, Washington. Like this post? Sign up here for a once-a-week email and you’ll never miss her columns.

@MindaZetlin


You know that job applicant has the right skills to fill your open position. But what about the right personality? Ignore cultural fit at your peril, for your new hire likely won’t last long.

I’ll always remember one of my co-workers at my first company. Although she did excellent work, she seemed to zig while the rest of us zagged. In a group of frumpy, often pudgy writers, she was an accomplished martial artist. Where many of us were just getting our feet wet in the business world, she had been around for a while and worked in some legendary places. Where we tended toward the silly-a plastic-encased slice of prosciutto once spent a week tacked to our department’s bulletin board-she was deadly serious. Not surprisingly, she soon moved on to a job at a prestigious non-profit that was working hard to change the world.

Hiring someone who doesn’t fit your company’s personality can be a very costly mistake. To avoid making that mistake, make sure to interview job candidates for cultural fit, as well as job qualifications. That advice comes from Tara Kelly, CEO of customer experience software provider SPLICE Software.

Kelly makes sure to include a culture interview in the hiring process, and she says it’s made a big difference. “It is important to understand employee values, motivators and interests,” she explains. “Understanding what keeps employees fulfilled is a key element to build a truly successful team. Whereas regular job interviews focus on verifying qualifications, culture fit interviews focus on ensuring potential candidates fit the corporate culture and core values of the organization.”

Given that every new hire is a big investment, it’s worth taking the time and effort to interview for cultural fit as well as skills and experience. Here’s how Kelly does it:

1. Define your company’s culture.

You may not need to do this, and Kelly doesn’t mention it, but if yours is a small or start-up companies, your culture may not be something you’ve given a lot of thought to. You should, though, because you definitely have one and a bad cultural hire will hurt you.

Your mission or vision statement is a good place to start-it won’t define your culture, but it should identify the values that drive you and your employees to show up and work hard every day. Beyond that, take a look around and consider how your company compares to others in your industry. Ask your employees or colleagues for input, until you can come up with a sentence or two that captures your company’s personality. Consider this example from Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos: “Our culture is friendly and intense, but if push comes to shove we’ll settle for intense.”

2. Write job ads with culture in mind.

“Culture fit should be integrated into every aspect of recruitment,” Kelly notes. That begins with your job ads, which should reflect both your company’s brand and its culture. If yours is an informal, family friendly workplace, with child care on site, and where pets are welcomed, say so. If yours is an elegant workplace with a prestigious history, say that.

3. Include culture questions in regular interviews.

From your first conversations with a candidate, interviewers should be thinking about cultural fit, Kelly says. “Once applications are assessed, pre-screening interviews should occur over the phone to see what first impressions candidates make and gauge personality for a possible fit.”

Candidates who pass this screening should be invited to an in-person interview with their potential department head. “The department head should also screen the applicant for culture by introducing a few less technical questions,” she adds.

4. Know which questions to ask, and which not to.

“Ask questions that speak to the core values and culture of the organization, without directly asking about each value,” Kelly advises. “For example, ask ‘what is something you have accomplished this summer that you are really proud of?'” This type of question helps SPLICE find candidates who like to learn new things or improve their skills. “At SPLICE, we really value a love of learning and improving things,” Kelly explains. “Our fundamental core value is, ‘We believe it can be better.’ So we like to see that not only in someone’s work life but their personal life too.”

It should go without saying that there’s a difference between culture and bias, and you should be clear about that difference, especially when it comes to questions that could land your company in legal trouble. To say that your culture is fun-loving and risk-taking is fine; to say that all employees should participate in extreme sports means your workplace discriminates against disabled or older workers.

In Amazon’s we’ll-settle-for-intense culture, an employee who’d just had a miscarriage was told by her supervisor that the company was likely the wrong place for a woman looking to start a family. Not surprisingly, many labor lawyers have been contacted by current or past employees seeking to sue the company for attitudes like these. Someday, one of these suits will get filed.

5. Train employees to conduct culture interviews.

“Once it is verified that a candidate has all the necessary qualifications and has passed all the preliminary culture fit screenings, a culture fit interview should be introduced as the last phase of the process,” Kelly says.

But you’re not the one to conduct the culture fit interview-the candidate’s potential co-workers are. That means they’ll need some training about what to ask and what to listen for. “It’s crucial to ensure the team is prepped on the purpose of a culture fit interview prior to participating,” Kelly says.

In general, she says, you should select four to six employees from around your company to talk informally with the job candidate about hobbies and interest and how these things tie in with your company’s personality. “Employees should be encouraged to ask questions that tie in to the organization’s value system.”

6. Gather feedback.

Employees who conduct a culture interview should fill out assessment afterwards that scores applicants on numerical scales of good-fit-to-bad-fit, and also ask for written comments. After you review those assessments, call the employees together for a quick debrief to make sure you understand their feedback and get a better sense of how the candidate might or might not fit with your company and its values. All of this input, together with the candidate’s performance on your skills assessment, will put you in the best position to make the right choice.


This article originally appeared on Inc.com – to view the original article visit http://eur.pe/1kkmevy.

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6 Ways to Find Out Whether a Job Candidate Will Fit Your Company’s Culture
Changing Limiting Beliefs: Do You Focus On Your Character Or Your Reputation? http://www.pgae.com/ask/changing-limiting-beliefs-do-you-focus-on-your-character-or-your-reputation/ Tue, 30 May 2017 15:21:56 +0000 Dr. Brian Hemmings http://www.pgae.com/?p=11946 The great American basketball coach John Wooden once said that sportsmen and sportswomen should focus more on their character rather than on their reputation...]]>

The great American basketball coach John Wooden once said that sportsmen and sportswomen should focus more on their character rather than on their reputation. Wooden remarked that character was ‘what you are’, whereas reputation was merely ‘what others think you are’. 

In nearly two decades of working in golf with PGA Professionals and elite players I hear a lot about pressure and see where coaches and players become overly worried about their ‘reputation’ rather than knowing and trusting in their own ‘character’.  Here I witness the limiting beliefs people have about themselves and the perceived consequences of poor results.

Often players will underperform because they feel pressure about how they might be viewed by others if they fail.  This can also affect coaches as they sometimes feel their own reputation is determined by the performance of those they coach, when in reality performance has so many variables, and the coach only contributes in specific ways.

In essence being overly concerned about your reputation creates instability as it is not under your control as it involves the perceptions of others.

Knowing the impact of limiting beliefs should give you the motivation you need to change them for yourself or to help players when you sense this is an issue. A healthy belief puts you into the right frame to have the best chance of success. It is also true that negative beliefs and thoughts have a huge impact on performance, so if we find it difficult to be positive then we must at least learn ways of managing negative thinking to keep it to a minimum and hence give ourselves a chance.

In the previous two articles I have written about the need for effective listening in coaching. Particular words to look out for are must, should and got. For instance, ‘I must make the cut; ‘I should beat this opponent’; or ‘I’ve got to win’. These words reveal very rigid, inflexible beliefs and create unnecessary pressure as they result in patterns of ‘all or nothing’ negative thinking.   It is much better to frame performance beliefs with a prefer approach.  For example, ‘I’d prefer to make the top ten’.

Article-Header-Images_Brian-Hemmings---Character

Often these beliefs hinder players’ views of themselves, their golf, and of their potential success.   So in future improve your coaching by listening carefully to the words your players use. They will reveal much about their thinking patterns and the performances that follow.

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Changing Limiting Beliefs: Do You Focus On Your Character Or Your Reputation?
The Benefits of Teasing Your Brain Regularly http://www.pgae.com/ask/the-benefits-of-teasing-your-brain-regularly/ Thu, 18 May 2017 10:53:47 +0000 Coaching4Careers http://www.pgae.com/?p=18832 Sometimes we need to trip our brains up and remind them to look beyond the obvious patterns, outside of what we already know works and not expect one situation]]>

Do you make assumptions that turn out to be incorrect? Do you miss information that didn’t fit the pattern you expected?

We all do. It’s the way our brains work. We look for patterns, use our previous experience and rely on what we already know works. It’s an efficient way to work…most of the time.

Sometimes however, we need to trip our brains up and remind them to look beyond the obvious patterns, outside of what we already know works and not expect one situation to turn out pretty much like the last one. If we don’t occasionally abandon our preconceptions there is a chance we may miss opportunities or changes in customer needs or market demands.

For example, what’s your first answer to this question?

Johnny’s mother had three children. The first child was named April. The second child was named May. What was the third child’s name?

Most people will reply June. Be honest. Did you? Of course if you re-read the question you’ll realise the answer is Johnny. But how many times do you make assumptions (that fit a known pattern) like this at work?

Try these three:

  1. Before Mt. Everest was discovered, what was the highest mountain in the world?
  2. How much dirt is there in a hole that measures two feet by three feet by four feet?
  3. If you were running a race and you passed the person in 2nd place, what place would you be in now?

You know by now that these are trick questions so it’s unlikely you assumed the first answer you thought of was correct i.e. K2, 24 cubic metres, 1st place, for example. That’s the first step in realising that what your brain expects to see may not, in fact, be the right answer.

Think about the words that are used: ‘before Mount Everest was DISCOVERED’; ‘How much dirt in the HOLE?’ The third one may require you to actual visualise yourself overtaking the person in SECOND place.

You may face questions like these at an interview because the hiring manager wants to see if you can think calmly, logically and perhaps differently from other people. They may want to see if you will take the time to read the question a little more carefully and think long enough before blurting out the first answer that comes into your head.

There are loads of these questions online to try and even if you’re not going for an interview, it’s good to tease your brain occasionally and get it to look at things differently. These questions are designed to challenge your critical thinking abilities, and to test specific skills like creativity and logic. The more you practise, the better equipped you will be to deal with and find solutions for tricky questions and situations that might come up at work.

P.S. The answers are Mount Everest – it was still there before it was discovered; None – because it’s a hole – and 2nd place – you’re still behind the person in first.


This content appears courtesy of Abintegro, experts in career management, transition technology & e-learning for today’s modern, mobile and technology-savvy workforce – Find out more at www.abintegro.com

Credit: Forbes; The Muse

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The Benefits of Teasing Your Brain Regularly
VIDEO – How to Balance Projects With Jason Glass http://www.pgae.com/ask/video-how-to-balance-projects-with-jason-glass/ Tue, 09 May 2017 14:22:17 +0000 Golf in the Life of http://www.pgae.com/?p=16618 Learn from Jason Glass about how to balance projects and do them all at a very high level. Great info for the entrepreneurial coach...]]>

Learn from Jason Glass about how to balance projects and do them all at a very high level. Great info for the entrepreneurial coach.

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VIDEO – How to Balance Projects With Jason Glass
The Value to Organisations of Offering Career Support to Staff http://www.pgae.com/ask/the-value-to-organisations-of-offering-career-support-to-staff/ Mon, 01 May 2017 15:35:07 +0000 Coaching4Careers http://www.pgae.com/?p=18631 Coaching4Careers explain how career management conversations can help keep and develop staff...]]>

There is little recent data about career management conversations in the workplace:

Kelly Global Workforce Index – August 2014 (230,000 people across 31 countries participated)

  • 57% people agree that career development discussions are beneficial in terms of the opportunity to acquire new skills
  • Only 38% had these discussions with their employer in the past year
  • Only 29% are satisfied with the career development resources provided by their employer

With global employment trends changing all the time, the need to keep and develop staff should be at the top of an organisations agenda.

Whether the organisation is a school, SME, Not for Profit or Corporate, many seem frightened to invest in the career management of their staff, they think staff will be unsettled, leave, or want more than they can offer. Some work very well with their staff, helping them manage their careers and reap the reward. The reality is that staff who feel valued and invested in are more likely to stay with an organisation and be motivated to work harder.


“Managing human capital is a misnomer. Humans are ‘beings’. We want to be known and valued for who we are, and our aspirations and ambitions recognised and seen as important. It’s a missed opportunity for an employer not to attend to these needs and thereby reap the productivity gains that accrue from more motivated, loyal employees”

(Talent, Careers and Organisations, What Next? Corporate Research Forum)

The value an organisation can reap when investing in their staff:

Staff are more settled and less distracted as they have plans for their future

  • Organisations can plan their future if they know what their staff want and plan to do
  • Demographics
  • Succession planning
  • Recruitment
  • In house development of staff
  • An organisation planning what will happen with regards to its staff must be more cost effective
  • Fewer surprises
  • Less need for interim, agency or contract staff
  • Better ongoing communication between staff and employer
  • Staff more likely to say if they are looking for a new role
  • Organisation able to deliver a more structured handover if they know a member of staff 
is/wants to leave
  • Employers who cannot afford financial rewards/bonuses, can support the development and 
career management of staff, which can be a cost-effective reward process.

The ability to manage your career and future is a life skill, if organisations don’t invest in their staff to give them these skills, how can they then pass on these skills to the people who work for them and to the next generation who they might educate and/or influence.

There are many processes for managing careers and these can be integrated into a workplace environment, below is a cycle often used to develop process that works within different organisations, depending on what is needed and required by the organisation and their staff.

Often employees find it easier to have these conversations with someone external first.

“My volunteers felt better placed to plan an effective conversation with their manager once they’d been coached, which is a win-win for the organisation”

(T Delamare, An action research study on the barriers facing women developing their careers and how they can be supported using a coaching framework. MA Dissertation, Oxford Brookes University, 2016)

“Internally focused workplace development opportunities are likely to ensure that a particular employer realises investment in development for the organisation. Yet, the worker might not have the skills transferable to other organisations. This is in contrast with the premise of the type of ‘deal’ where enhancement of employability is the key value derived from the employment relationship by the worker. Instead, they may be receiving only the development that is relevant to their current employer, without the promise of job security.”

(CIPD – Attitudes to Employability and Talent, Sept 2016)

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The Value to Organisations of Offering Career Support to Staff
PGA of Holland 2017 CPD Schedule – Open to All PGA Members http://www.pgae.com/news/pga-of-holland-2017-cpd-schedule-open-to-all-pga-members/ Tue, 25 Apr 2017 12:16:34 +0000 PGA of Holland http://www.pgae.com/?p=18704 Various events from the PGA of Holland's extensive 2017 CPD schedule are open to all PGA Professionals from across the PGAs of Europe's Member Countries...]]>

Various events from the PGA of Holland’s extensive 2017 CPD schedule are open to all PGA Member Professionals from across the PGAs of Europe’s Member Country PGAs.

Details can be found below and by clicking the links to enquire/find out more.

DATE TITLE PRICE HOURS LOCATION
22 May Force Plate €180 8 The Dutch, Netherlands
18 Jul Decade Course Management Systems Seminar, Scott Fawcett €250 ex VAT 6 The International, Netherlands
31 Jul Jo Mayo/Jeff Smith/Sasho Mackenzie €300 De Goyer, Netherlands
12-14 Sept Instinctive Golf Coaching European Summit €600 24 TBC
09-10 Oct Bioswing Dynamics Level 1 €500 16 The Dutch, Netherlands
11 Oct Bioswing Dynamics Level 2 €250 8 The Dutch, Netherlands

18 July – Decade Course Management Systems Seminar, Scott Fawcett

31 July – Jo Mayo/Jeff Smith/Sasho Mackenzie

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PGA of Holland 2017 CPD Schedule – Open to All PGA Members
Top Skills For Job Hunting Success in 2017 http://www.pgae.com/ask/top-skills-for-job-hunting-success-in-2017/ Tue, 11 Apr 2017 14:11:13 +0000 Coaching4Careers http://www.pgae.com/?p=18610 Coaching4Careers assess LinkedIn's list of the top skills employers are looking for in 2017...]]>

Having canvassed a wide cohort of global businesses, the social media platform LinkedIn has released its list of the top skills employers are looking for in 2017. With the New year just around the corner and resolutions beginning to surface for consideration, this is a list worth consulting. However, if you’re a technophobe you might want to look away now…

Not surprisingly, there is a strong technology bias to the list, with 19 out of the 25 competencies listed carrying a clear tech focus. The upper-end of the list, in particular, is dominated by cutting-edge technical disciplines including cloud computing, software development and online security.

The more traditional skills of previous years have been bumped down to make room: marketing campaign management, SEO/SEM, and channel marketing were in high demand among employers going into 2016; however, most have since fallen out of the top 10.

Without further ado, the top 10 skills (according to LinkedIn) are as follows:

  1. Cloud and Distributed Computing
  2. Statistical Analysis and Data Mining
  3. Web Architecture and Development Framework
  4. Middleware and Integration Software
  5. User Interface Design
  6. Network and Information Security
  7. Mobile Development
  8. Data Presentation
  9. SEO/SEM Marketing
  10. Storage Systems and Management

You could be forgiven for assuming the skills listed above are reserved for those from an IT or computer science background, but, nowadays, technological proficiency is now a key requirement across most industries and roles.

For example, analysis by PayScale, suggests that HR workers familiar with Workday software can expect an additional 10% in their pay packet each month.

The good news for those coming from a non-technical background (eg your typical arts or humanities graduate) is that achieving a good level of proficiency in these areas is not as far-fetched as it might seem.

LinkedIn now offers its own learning portal, with 5,000 different course options on offer, catering to the whole spectrum of technology users, from digital novices to IT specialists. This platform is just one of a growing selection technical courses that today’s job seekers can avail of, either online or offline.

To be sure, regardless of how and where you ply your trade, the need for technically-proficient workers is only going to grow and grow over the coming years. For those willing to broaden their skill set, a blend of technological and business-friendly competencies – such as critical thinking, problem-solving and communication – can prove a potent, career-boosting combination. If you’re stuck for a new year’s resolution to focus your efforts on, you could do a lot worse than invest in a spot of upskilling.


This content appears courtesy of Abintegro, experts in career management, transition technology & e-learning for today’s modern, mobile and technology-savvy workforce – Find out more at www.abintegro.com

Credit: We Forum; Business Insider; Time; Laser Fiche

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Top Skills For Job Hunting Success in 2017
Isn’t Coaching the Same as Mentoring? http://www.pgae.com/ask/isnt-coaching-the-same-as-mentoring/ Wed, 05 Apr 2017 13:57:58 +0000 Mark Taylor http://www.pgae.com/?p=18603 "Downey’s Spectrum of Coaching Skills gives pause for thought as we consider whether one can be called a coach if learners are told what we would do..."]]>

Downey’s Spectrum of Coaching Skills gives pause for thought as we consider whether one can be called a coach if learners are told what we would do in their circumstances. The quick answer is that if you make a proposal then you are closer to mentoring or training.

Coaching is about using the appropriate questions to establish whether the learner can find their own solution to a need or problem. As Downey says, the most important distinction in the spectrum is between directive and non-directive coaching. It is dangerous to assume that when one is told something then one knows that something. This is too often not the case.

‘Occasionally, as part of a training programme to develop coaching skills, I take the participants onto the golf course. The purpose in this is to get them to deepen their non-directive coaching skills, the theory being that if they do not know the techniques involved in playing golf they cannot resort to instructions’.

Many golf coaches, professionals, teachers, trainers and facilitators, have come across similar situations; Downey puts it down to being ‘trapped in teaching’ and suggests that, ironically, we do not always consider that teaching might not have too much to do with learning.

The Nature and Role of Coaching

What is coaching?

  • The key which unlocks the potential to ultimate performance.
  • Facilitates SMART (Specific Measurable Achievable Realistic Time-bound) learning to set achievable goals.
  • Encouragement of self belief and positive internal interactions in order to realise potential and achieve goals.
  • A two-way process where an individual’s performance is improved through reflection on the task and analysed through conversation and questioning with their coach. Both agree on a plan of action, set SMART objectives and then act to achieve their goal. The coach monitors progress at agreed intervals and gives decisive feedback.
  • A recognised style of leadership.

What does a learning Coach Do?

A learning Coach:

  • Provides support, guidance, coaching and mentoring to learners to help them plan their own learning
  • Creates student ownership – allows student to identify their own learning strategies
  • Maximises progress in a variety of areas of intelligence, including emotional intelligence
  • Identifies goals
  • Develops action plans
  • Monitors, reflects and records progress.

Twelve Principles of Coaching

To provide opportunities for others to learn about their own performance, their limitations and their solutions, it is crucial that the coach creates an environment for learning. People see benefits from coaching in a place where it is safe to disclose information and share ideas that, perhaps, have never been disclosed before. Trust must be built, therefore the following principles apply:

  1. Non-judgmental
  2. Non-critical
  3. Believe that students have all the answers within them
  4. Adjust ‘big goals’ into achievable steps
  5. Hold a genuine willingness to learn from their students
  6. Respect confidentiality
  7. Build and maintain self-esteem
  8. Be positive
  9. Challenge students to move outside their comfort zone and habits
  10. Believe that there are always solutions to issues
  11. Attentive to recognising and pointing out strengths
  12. Believe that self-knowledge improves performance

Change of Thinking

To excel as a learning coach we may need to fundamentally change our thinking. A learning coach needs to drop their own agenda to resolve other people’s problems and develop a more open-minded approach, resisting the temptation to guide individuals towards solutions. Coaching is about a principled, trustworthy and honest approach to support people in finding their own solutions…learning coaches can but rarely advise.

Learning coaches grow the belief in students that if they think an issue, problem or concern through, then they will know the next step in resolving the situation; all they need to do is to take action and follow it, which will lead to improvement.

Do you:

  • Complete other people’s sentences in your head before they have finished? Move on in your mind to the solution that you would choose for the person?
  • Use closed questions to direct people?
  • Use leading questions to guide others to a specific solution that you have identified? Almost instantly believe that you know the answer they need?
  • Make up your mind on one way to resolve a problem or enhance performance and push that idea?
  • Become annoyed if your solutions for others are rejected?
  • Find that your ideas are not implemented and then the same individual returns with other problems for you to resolve?
  • Secretly acknowledge that you do not have the answers to all the problems of others?

If any or all of the above apply to you, then coaching could be a way of relieving frustrations, dissipating annoyance and taking the pressure off yourself to come up with the answer. Coaching will allow you to promote independent thinking in others. A key skill required of a teacher!

The fundamental rule in non-directive coaching is that we do not step ahead of the student and plan the path to a solution for them. The coach must silence their inner agenda to solve the problem ahead of the student. When coaches give advice or guidance they remove from the student any understanding of the process. If the student does not understand the process, then they return again for advice. Coach them, and they get the answers and the process to use next time.

Learning Coaches are curious..

Learning Coaches ask questions..

Learning Coaches support students to learn about their situation fully. Learning Coaches are more than problem-solvers, they encourage others to understand their perspective and amend their behaviours to allow optimum performance.

“Alfred Korzybski in 1933 explained the concept that ‘the map is not the territory’. In other words, what we experience of a situation is not necessarily how our student experiences it and vice versa” (Thomas, 2005, p.15).

“Only the student fully appreciates the complexity of their current situation”.

Time for Reflection!…

When did you last experience something that seemed very different for another person?

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Isn’t Coaching the Same as Mentoring?
PGA Professional Spotlight: Adam Kritikos (PGA of Greece and GB&I) http://www.pgae.com/ask/pga-professional-spotlight-adam-kritikos-pga-of-greece-and-gbi/ Thu, 02 Mar 2017 09:03:04 +0000 PGAs of Europe http://www.pgae.com/?p=18310 Adam Kritikos is a PGA Professional coach at Costa Navarino in Greece assisting with the growth of golf in the Messinia region and Greece as a whole...]]>

Adam Kritikos is a PGA Professional coach at Costa Navarino golf resort in Greece and is one of the PGA of Greece’s leading lights, assisting with not only the growth of golf in the Messinia region but also throughout the country with his educational role with the PGA of Greece itself.

Our PGA Professional Spotlight is cast over Adam and we find out more about what he gets up to on a day-to-day basis and how he got there…

IGPN: How did your career as a PGA Professional first begin?

Adam: Following my years of representing the Greek National Team as an amateur, and having completed a BA(Hons) degree in Golf Management at the University of Central Lancashire, I was approached by Costa Navarino to take on the role of Assistant Professional and to also grow the game in our local region.

IGPN: How did you end up in your current position?

Adam: I got a job offer from Costa Navarino to work as the Pro properly – I was lucky as my reputation as a player was known and then my qualifications from the UK with the PGA of GB&I.

IGPN: Explain a bit about your business that you run now…

Adam: As the PGA Pro at Costa Navarino I cater to giving lessons to customers, as well as organising club competitions and other operational needs of the club.

I am also in charge of the ‘Costa Navarino Junior Golf Academy’ – a scholarship programme aimed at developing local kids into elite golfers. After 5 years, the programme has reached 55 junior members.

IGPN: What does being a PGA Professional mean to you?

Adam: For me a PGA Professional is an ambassador for the game in every sense. Things like dress code, behaviour, playing ability, attitude and work ethic are things that being a PGA Professional is all about and I’m very proud to be able to say I am a PGA Professional.

IGPN: How important is it for PGA Professionals to strive to continually improve their skills, knowledge and development in general?

Adam: It’s important to stay up to date with the ever-developing trends and skill-sets in today’s job markets. Being up to date with social media trends, equipment news, technology, like Trackman or FlightScope, and CPD, like workshops, are important to add value to your profile as a PGA Professional.

IGPN: What would the biggest top you could give a PGA Professional looking for a news job or trying to develop themselves and their skills?

Adam: Attention to detail – and make sure the service you provide is the best possible.

IGPN: What would your advice be to someone looking to work abroad?

Adam: Do your best to adapt to the local way of life and try to learn the local language – both of these things help you integrate more with colleagues and customers and ultimately you will enjoy yourself more and get more from it if you can do that.


For more information about Costa Navarino visit www.costanavarino.com.

This article originally featured in International Golf Pro News. Visit the IGPN Page to find out more and subscribe for free.

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PGA Professional Spotlight: Adam Kritikos (PGA of Greece and GB&I)
Community of Practice Summit (COPS) 2017 – CPD http://www.pgae.com/ask/community-of-practice-summit-cops-2017-cpd/ Tue, 14 Feb 2017 14:28:44 +0000 PGAs of Europe http://www.pgae.com/?p=18140 PGA Professionals are invited to attend the 2017 Community of Practice Summit at North Hants Golf Club in the UK.]]>

PGA Professionals are invited to attend the 2017 Community of Practice Summit at North Hants Golf Club in the UK.

The sessions will be facilitated by PGA of GB&I Fellow Professional, Kevin Flynn and features a range of diverse speakers:

  • David Todhunter – 4D Motion Sports
  • Scott Fawcett – Playing Lesson
  • Terry Hashimoto – BODiTrak Sports
  • Graeme McDowall – Constraints Led Practice
  • Adrian Rietveld & Mark Thistleton – Club Fitting
  • Nigel Tilley – European Tour Physiotherapist

Date: 2 & 3 March 2017
Venue: North Hants Golf Club, UK
Cost: £195

For more information contact Kevin Flynn @ kevin1flynn@hotmail.com

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Community of Practice Summit (COPS) 2017 – CPD
8 Top Tips For Working Abroad http://www.pgae.com/ask/8-top-tips-for-working-abroad/ Mon, 13 Feb 2017 09:26:05 +0000 Golf Retailing http://www.pgae.com/?p=14964 Want to work in a different country? Here are some top tips to help you before taking the plunge and then when you are on the ground…]]>

Taking the plunge and working outside of your native country can be a nerve-wracking thing, but with the right planning and preparation it could end up being the best move of your life.

Here are some top tips on what to think about before taking the plunge and then when you are on the ground…

1. Put Yourself Out There

If you are looking for a position then put yourself out there – many successful candidates for jobs in other countries have taken the plunge and gone out to the country first to either look for positions, connect and network with people, or perhaps even for a face-to-face interview rather than over Skype or the telephone.  Maybe even take an extended holiday and rent an apartment to get a taste of life there.

2. Research, Research, Research

Research the country, its history, culture and traditions.  You might be going somewhere quite similar to where you currently live but it is almost a certainty that they will do things differently and you should do your best to learn about these and adapt yourself to their country.

3. Understand the Golf Market

Just like everyday culture, the golf market has its intricacies and nuances in every country. We can see this at the PGAs of Europe quite easily on a day-to-day basis as each and every one of our 37 Member PGAs operates in their own unique way.

Locate some local golfing ‘experts’, journalists, PGAs, their PGA Professionals and the amateur Federation and simply send them an email or ask to meet to discuss how golf works in that country.

4. Get your documents In Order

Speak to your country’s foreign/international office and your national embassy in the destination country to make sure you are doing all the right things.  It’s great if your new employer is going to help sort a lot of it out but you need to ensure you understand everything you should yourself.

Make sure you understand the country’s employment regulations for international workers, what visa requirements there might be, travel documentation require, insurance, and of course any associated costs.

5. Find a Mentor

PGA of Germany Professional, Craig West, moved from South Africa to Germany and suggests having someone with you, at least at first, who can help you translate if required and understands what you need to do to get off on the right foot.  Plus they can be the link between you and other local people, fellow staff members and in the local golfing industry.

6. Learn the Language

The local language is one of the most important tools you can have when working in a different country.  It makes every day-to-day task easier and can allow you to understand and operate more effectively.  It also means locals will not have to adjust themselves to you as much which is great for building relationships with all walks of life.  Even a few words here and there to begin with can be very beneficial!

(And if they speak your native language there already then learn a new language anyway – it will always come in useful!)

7. Don’t expect it to be easy!

Working in a different country can potentially be the most difficult thing you ever do in your career – not only do you have to do the job effectively, but you also have to adapt yourself into a different environment at the same time. But with well thought-out preparation and commitment then you will be able to do your best in your new position.

8. Go With It!

Lastly, go with the flow and enjoy it!  Your day-to-day working experience and the enjoyment and benefits you get from working abroad is directly related to how you approach it, so do your best to be outgoing, meet new people, try new foods and experience new cultural aspects to ingratiate yourself into the local life.

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Post your job vacancy for FREE and get expert careers advice at the PGAs of Europe JobZone – visit www.pgae.com/careers-and-jobs to find out more.

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8 Top Tips For Working Abroad
PGA of Sweden Teaching & Coaching Summit – The Leading Edge http://www.pgae.com/news/pga-of-sweden-teaching-coaching-summit-the-leading-edge/ Sat, 14 Jan 2017 15:40:31 +0000 PGA of Sweden http://www.pgae.com/?p=17629 The PGA of Sweden invite all PGA Professional Members to their PGA Summit from 8-10 March at Hotel Tylösand in Halmstad, Sweden...]]>

Halmstad, 8-10 March 2017

The PGA of Sweden invite all PGA Professional Members to their PGA Summit from 8-10 March at Hotel Tylösand in Halmstad, Sweden.

The theme for the day is “The Leading Edge” and refers partly to the blade, technology and leadership. You will be able to meet a number of interesting speakers who will share their knowledge in a variety of areas that you find useful in your professional role.

Speakers include:

  • Cameron McCormick
  • Anna Wilson
  • Christer Olsson
  • Maria Möller
  • Anna Iwarsson
  • Viktor Gustavsson

The course fee for the PGA’s Summit 2150SEK +VAT and includes lunch on Wednesday – Friday and Annual Meeting Dinner.

The price is valid until February 8. Thereafter, the fee is 2500SEK +VAT. The PGA Summit is open only for PGA members and specially invited guests.

Click here to find out more and register your place: http://eur.pe/2h7cLtW

PROGRAM

WEDNESDAY

09:00 Coffee is served
10:00 to 10:15 Event Opening

Introduction: SGF, GAF and PGA

10:15 to 12:00 Courage to lead both themselves and others (Joint session with GAF)

Anna Iwarsson

12:00 to 13:30 Lunch
13:30 to 15:00 Journey to High Performance Ignition to Achievement

Cameron McCormick

3:00 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. Pause
15.30.17.30 From knowing to doing

Christer Olsson

Thursday

09:00 to 10:00 Communicative Leadership

Anna Wilson

10:00 to 10:30 Pause
10:30 to 12:00 Continued… Communicative Leadership

Anna Wilson

12:00 to 13:30 Lunch
13:30 to 15:00 Lifestyle and fitness trends

Anna Iwarsson

3:00 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. Pause
15:30 to 16:30 Thesis presentations
18:30 PGA Annual Meeting
19:45 Annual Meeting Dinner

Friday

09:00 to 10:00 Golf facilities as an attractive workplace

Maria Möller

10:00 to 10:30 Pause
10:30 to 12:00 Training to High Performance

Cameron McCormick

12:00 to 13:30 Lunch
13:30 to 15:00 Player Development, an exciting journey

Viktor Gustavsson

15:00 Termination year Summit

Claes Björklund and Johan Hampf

Click here to find out more and register your place: http://eur.pe/2h7cLtW

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PGA of Sweden Teaching & Coaching Summit – The Leading Edge
The Key Qualities They Are Really Looking For in an Interview http://www.pgae.com/ask/the-key-qualities-they-are-really-looking-for-in-an-interview/ Tue, 06 Dec 2016 11:50:00 +0000 Coaching4Careers http://www.pgae.com/?p=11294 Interview revelation number one: your achievements rarely just speak for themselves. While qualifications and professional background may have gotten your foot]]>

Interview revelation number one: your achievements rarely just speak for themselves. While qualifications and professional background may have gotten your foot in the door, ‘personal fit’ is likely to be just as important a factor when it comes to the interview stage of a job application.

Your interviewer is likely to be looking for evidence of the innate qualities and softer skills that play a big part in determining whether you’re the right person for the job. These are some of the key character traits your potential employer really wants to see:

1. Motivation

Most employers are looking to do more than just fill a spot on the pay roll. What interviewers arguably value above all else is a genuine desire to work for their organisation and to share in their long-term vision and goals.

Demonstrate this by showing you really understand the company and what differentiates it from its competitors. Being inquisitive and asking questions is an effective way of showing interest and engagement.

2. Communication

A CV can be doctored, professional experience spun or plumped up, but people skills are hard to fake in a face-to-face environment. How you go about building a rapport with your prospective employer offers them vital clues as to how you’ll interact with colleagues and clients. Little things – like smiling, making eye contact – can certainly help spark the connection you need.

Remember to talk about your experience of working in a team: when you’ve recognised you need other people and that collaboration has engendered great things. Businesses only succeed with good teams.

3. Problem solving

This is more than being good at the odd puzzle it’s about an innate desire and ability to go the extra mile, really look at the issues and a drive to find solutions. It’s your opportunity to demonstrate resourcefulness, enthusiasm, dynamism, agility and innovative thinking.

Go to the interview with examples of your problem solving skills, but more than that – get excited about sinking your teeth into something and finding a solution for all concerned. Employers love a problem solver.

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4. Inspiration

Hiring managers are hoping to come across that one, unique candidate who will inspire them and demand to be hired on the spot. When selling yourself as the perfect candidate how you deliver your story becomes just as important as what you are saying. Originality and authenticity are key qualities so avoid focusing on generic skills and attributes that your competitors might have. Keep it concise and hone in on your ‘unique’ experiences and achievements, showcasing them at the beginning of your delivery.

Of course, each role is different, but that doesn’t mean that some approaches and techniques aren’t better than others. A few staple building blocks from which to build your interview strategy can be a great place to start.


This content appears courtesy of Abintegro, experts in career management, transition technology & e-learning for today’s modern, mobile and technology-savvy workforce – Find out more at www.abintegro.com

Credit: Fortune; LinkedIn

Vector image designed by Freepik

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The Key Qualities They Are Really Looking For in an Interview
Do What You Do Best But DON’T Forget the Rest! http://www.pgae.com/ask/do-what-you-do-best-but-dont-forget-the-rest/ Thu, 01 Dec 2016 08:03:46 +0000 Jeremy Dale http://www.pgae.com/?p=14633 Switch-hitting trick shot artist, Jeremy Dale, explains that specialising and THEN diversifying can help maximise your opportunities as a specialist...]]>

‘’Do what you do best and forget the rest’’ was the advice once given to me by a businessman at a golf day in Australia.

In a way, it is good advice (to start with anyway) because once you are a specialist, you have authority, can build a reputation and are likely to be paid more.

For the modern PGA Professional this makes perfect sense, we have seen a trend over the last 20 years towards specialist players, coaches, golf psychologists, retailers, club-fitters, club managers, corporate event organisers etc and away from the traditional club professional model – although, of course, that quite rightly still exists.

So how do you maximise your opportunities as a specialist?

It might seem contradictory but my solution was to specialise and THEN diversify.

The day golf finally met business for Jeremy Dale

I am quite certain that no professional golfer ever set out to become a trick shot artist.

Everyone dreams of playing for a living BUT, when you see a new opportunity, it is a good idea to explore the potential.

My big chance came in the summer of 1991 at the Rijswijkse Golf Club in The Hague when Head Professional John Woof unwittingly gave me the opportunity of a lifetime – an opportunity that quite literally presented me with a fork in the road of my career.

Find yourself a business model (or mentor) BUT make up your own version

As an assistant, I saw a really good future business model in John.

He was earning from a few different areas of the golf business but was really well known at that time in Holland for the quality of his play.

As well as winning tournaments (both nationally & internationally) and making the PGA Cup team, he was also a successful coach, had some sponsors and, importantly for me, he performed a really good trick shot golf show. It was the first one I had ever seen and I liked the combination of entertainment mixed with a high level of skill and accuracy.

John also ran events (for his sponsors & featuring his show), sometimes took them on private outings to famous courses, and later in his career, despite being a foreigner, he became a golf commentator on Dutch TV.

It was especially obvious to me that John was able to carry over his reputation for tournament golf into everything else he did.

I concluded that to have a good career in golf, you should be really good at one thing (whatever your speciality might be) but ALSO diversify your range of products AND be good at selling them……..by the way, don’t forget that last one!

(If you are a coach read Ian Clark’s excellent blog on making sales and creating a client base)

Look out for a life changing opportunity

I decided that I needed to put together a golf show………….….if I could become really good at that then it would do for my business what playing had done for John.

The problem was that I did not want to copy anyone, I needed a USP of my own and was well aware of the importance of being my own person.

I had no idea what that could be until that day at Rijswijk in 1991 when John asked me to give a lesson to one of his sponsors, who happened to be left-handed.

After the lesson, I asked if I could have a go with his club since I had never hit a shot left-handed. It felt quite good and I was very surprised at the quality of my best shots so I spent the whole evening on the range.

This did not have to be a life changing moment, but that is exactly how it turned out.

I decided there and then that I was going to relearn the game left-handed so that I could put together a switch-hitting golf show, something that, unsurprisingly, had never been done.

I was about to find out why.

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Left-Handed Golf – my hard won USP

John said: ‘’Give yourself two years’’ and (cryptically) ‘’You never know’’.

He was right on both counts.

My father always used to say ”We never give in’’. He was only partly joking, it’s great advice.

Everyone else thought I was nuts and looking back, I can see what they meant.

My good friend and co-assistant at the club, Michael Unsworth, had seen almost every shot of my left-handed experiment, from hitting air shots to making cuts in Dutch PGA events.

I knew I was making progress when he said to me:

‘’When you started playing left-handed I would always hope you’d hit a good shot off the first tee……..now I kind of hope you don’t!’’

It was a frantic time. Somehow, within two years, I learned to speak Dutch fluently, made the required scores in professional tournaments (left-handed) and passed the exams with the Dutch PGA. Later, having contacted Lawrie Thornton at the PGAs of Europe, I passed the British PGA exams too.

I was all set for a career in golf as a trick shot artist and did my first proper show in April 1994 at Golf & Country Club ‘t Sybrook in the Netherlands.

You never know!

Wind the clock forward and these days people assume that switch-hitting was just something I could always naturally do but nothing could be further from the truth.

It had seemed impossible to me that I would make a living from golf but it has somehow happened.

So far I have performed my show in 39 countries in front of business people and top golfers from all parts of the globe. I have also met and performed with many of the great golfers I grew up watching on TV. Gary Player, Seve, Nick Faldo, Colin Montgomerie, Tony Jacklin, Padraig Harrington, Ian Woosnam and so the list goes on.

Specialise in one thing – but diversify your business too

What I have also done is (like John Woof) use the golf show to develop other areas of my business.

Here is a list of the other things I have done in the last 20 years in golf:

  • PGA Coach – individual coaching, golf schools and golf holidays
  • TV presenter
  • Organiser and Promoter – World Golf Trick Shot Championship
  • Writer
  • Charity event organiser
  • After Dinner Speaker
  • Brand Ambassador
  • Master of Ceremonies
  • Agent
  • Charity Auctioneer
  • Business and Marketing Consultant for other PGA professionals

I even won a trick shot competition in America in 2015 and finished No. 2 in the World Golf Trick Shot Championships in 2005.

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Specialists really do get paid more

My advice to any golf professional is to find the thing you do best and specialise.

Work hard to gain the knowledge and expertise you will need – invest in yourself, go on courses, ask other PGA Members and read everything you can find on your subject.

It does not matter what your specialist area might be. As long as you are (and are seen as) one of the market leaders, you’ll have an advantage you can really use.

Being an expert gives you credibility and a chance to make a reputation that you can THEN exploit into other areas.

I think it is a winning formula.

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Do What You Do Best But DON’T Forget the Rest!
Danish Teaching & Coaching Conference 2017 http://www.pgae.com/news/danish-teaching-coaching-conference-2017/ Wed, 30 Nov 2016 15:48:31 +0000 PGA of Denmark http://www.pgae.com/?p=17430 The PGA of Denmark invite all PGA Professionals from PGAs of Europe Member Countries to the 2017 Danish Teaching & Coaching Conference...]]>

The PGA of Denmark invite all PGA Professionals from PGAs of Europe Member Countries to the 2017 Danish Teaching & Coaching Conference from 28th February – 1st March 2017, as well as to two extra days: 2nd March – 3rd March 2017.

The Teaching & Coaching Conference takes place at Hotel Scandic Sydhavnen in Copenhagen, Denmark and will see Mike Adams, Scott Fawcett and Scott Lynn present in various seminars across the conference days.

Several suppliers will also attend at the seminars, giving attendees the opportunity to speak to representatives from Smart to Move, My Swing, Flightscope and Trackman.

PGA Professionals can find out more about the schedule and speakers by downloading the ‘Danish Teaching & Coaching Conference 2017’ PDF, with registrations being made directly with the PGA of Denmark’s Steffen Jacobsen (steffen@pga.dk). Registrations close Sunday 15th January 2017.

Click here to download ‘Danish Teaching & Coaching Conference 2017’ PDF (1.3MB)

CONFERENCE SCHEDULE

Tuesday 28th February

Scott Fawcett: Course Management – What is the Decade System?
The DECADE Course Management System, created by Scott Fawcett, has solved golf strategy by combining shot distribution patterns and PGA Tour scoring statistics. When Scott combined those two data sets he created a simple way to optimize target selection. Good players know if a pin is closely guarded by a lake to favor the center of the green – but how much? DECADE quickly generates the optimal target that will produce the lowest score based on distance, hazards, and hole location.

Wednesday 1st March

Mike Adams: Through a series of screens we are able to determine: 01. The student ́s dominant power source. With this information gathered from the screens the instructors are able to develop a Blueprint or road map for each students optimal swing.

ADDITIONAL DAYS

MIKE ADAMS & SCOTT LYNN – BIOSWING MECHANICS LEVEL 2 – UNDERSTANDING AND APPLYING

Tuesday 2nd March

Mike Adams & Scott Lynn: Dr Scott Lynn, Biomechanist, will go into more depth abut Biomechanics. Mike Adams and Scott Lynn discuss how to test each student, to determine whether they are a Glidder, Spinner or Launcher. Understanding the differences and how to determine who will benefit from each power source. We will teach the instructors how to use force plates to determine the optimal lower body movements for each student.

Each instructor will learn how to increase the students club head and ball speed, change the the students angle of attack, path, plane and club face. Understanding the numbers on Trackman(Flight Scope) to determine which numbers match which swing type.

Friday 3rd March

Mike Adams & Scott Lynn: Practical application using the screens and drills to make the students better. On the range with Trackman, Flight Scope, MySwing, Swing Catalyst 3D plates and S2M teaching the teachers how to use these tools to improve their students.
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Danish Teaching & Coaching Conference 2017
[PODCAST] Work Walking Into Your Schedule http://www.pgae.com/ask/work-walking-into-your-schedule/ Wed, 30 Nov 2016 02:25:23 +0000 Coaching4Careers http://www.pgae.com/?p=11024 Walking rarely gets the recognition it deserves, especially when it comes to the world of business and management.]]>

Walking rarely gets the recognition it deserves, especially when it comes to the world of business and management.

Unlike its publicity-courting cousin, running, walking is rarely associated with leadership and success. There are relatively few examples of Fortune 500 CEOs ‘powering through’ a 20k stroll on their way to work, nor prime-time comedians ‘sauntering’ through the Sahara Desert for their latest charity/publicity drive. Walking is an also-ran in more ways than one.

And yet, a quick flick through the history books reveals enough famous walkers to more than rival their more fleet-footed counterparts.

From Beethoven to Steve Jobs and the Queen, walking has helped many a historic heavyweight to achieve success in their chosen field, even if they haven’t yet felt the need to brag about it to their favourite financial journal.

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As scientists will attest, walking offers an array of benefits for regular practitioners.  Aside from the obvious physical perks of regular exercise, there are the various mental benefits to consider.

Walkers tend to enjoy lower stress levels, as well as increased cognitive function.  To add to this, a recent study by Stanford University found moving around led to an increase in creativity in 81% of participants who had previously been seated.

The only area where walking really falls short (aside from the crummy PR team behind it) is the obvious time commitment involved.  This may explain why it’s rarely the activity of choice among time-pressured modern professionals.

The flipside to this is that, contrary to more aerobically challenging activities, it can be crow-barred relatively easily into the working day.  As well as being the perfect option for a reinvigorating, yet sweat-free lunch break, it is a great way to put a new angle on interviews, one-on-one meetings, and brainstorming sessions.

The most potent pro-ambulatory argument, however, is perhaps the fact that walking is what we humans are originally designed to do.  Not pounding the pavement clad in lycra or expensive running shoes, or – worse still – wedged in behind a computer screen for 10 hours straight.

Walking may not win you any awards in the image stakes, but your body (and possibly career) will thank you for it.


This content appears courtesy of Abintegro, experts in career management, transition technology & e-learning for today’s modern, mobile and technology-savvy workforce – Find out more at www.abintegro.com

Credit: LinkedIn; Design School; Inc.com

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[PODCAST] Work Walking Into Your Schedule
PGA Professional Spotlight: Craig West (PGA of Germany) http://www.pgae.com/ask/pga-professional-spotlight-craig-west-pga-of-germany/ Wed, 16 Nov 2016 12:57:53 +0000 PGAs of Europe http://www.pgae.com/?p=13761 South African-born Craig West has been a PGA of Germany Professional for 22 years and in that time has overcome the challenges of moving to another country and]]>

South African-born Craig West has been a PGA of Germany Professional for 22 years and in that time has overcome the challenges of moving to another country and not knowing the language to build his own business, West Golf.

IGPN spoke to Craig to find out how he built his career and how what he learnt is now shaping how he employs people and advances his business.

IGPN: How did your career as a PGA Professional first begin?

Craig: I started as an Assistant Professional at the Fancourt Resort in South Africa in 1992, under Jeff Clause, the American Director of Golf there. After moving to Germany in the mid 90s, I did the PGA of Germany program, which was a very thorough experience and one that I am very glad to have done.

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IGPN: How did you end up in your current position in Germany?

Craig: At Fancourt we had many German guests staying in the hotel. They were always telling me how the game of golf was booming in Germany (Bernhard Langer had won the Masters in 1985) and there was great potential for Professionals who wanted to teach or run golf clubs.

The owner of a driving range was a guest at the hotel and after we had spent a round of golf or two together he asked me if would consider coming over to Germany and working for him. He didn’t have to ask twice and six weeks later I was on a plane to Germany.

IGPN: What was it like moving to, and working in, a new country where you had to learn about the culture and the language?

Craig: A lot tougher than I was expecting, that’s for sure! The language was tough and the German attitude and way of doing things was very much more structured than in South Africa.

The weather was also a shock. I will never forget the moment I walked off the plane (in February) and was “hit” by the coldest wind I would not even have been able to imagine. And then realising that it was a typical winters day!

IGPN: What was the biggest challenge you faced when deciding to work in another country?

Craig: Leaving the country you have grown up in is about as tough a decision as you’ll ever make. Not being able to speak the language properly in the first year or so is very tough and your self-confidence takes more than its share of knocks.

IGPN: What would your advice be to someone looking to work abroad?

Craig: It’s great if you have someone there that can help you in the beginning. Going to a governmental department to go and get yourself registered when you cannot speak the language is an experience you either take with humor or you’re in for one hell of a day!

If you are moving to country where they speak a language you can‘t then I strongly suggest doing a language course as soon as possible, maybe in your own country before leaving.

Being able to communicate in your “new” country is THE most important tool to getting ahead in everything else. You need to get integrated as fast as you can make friends from your “new” country as fast as possible, which as a golf Professional is normally quite easy to do.

IGPN: Explain a bit about your business that you run now.

Craig: I always had the dream of building my own course (what golfer doesn’t!) and in 2007 I managed to get the piece of land and found an investor to finance the building of the course.

In September 2009 we opened West Golf (www.west-golf.com) and we had 300 members even before the course was opened. It’s a public facility, where golf is not expensive and we cater to a younger crowd, making it also attractive to families.

I manage the facility and also run the Golf Academy, which turns out about roughly 350 new golfers every year, where we then get most of our members.

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IGPN: What do you look for when you are hiring PGA Professionals?

Craig: I have had several Apprentices and Professionals come through the Golf Academy and to be honest, the most important thing I look for is that someone truly loves the game. Everything else takes care of itself after that. I have never had the feeling of having an actual job; I just love what I do and get to do it everyday if I want to.

I also look for someone who is keen to learn, willing to take advice and spend time learning from the best teachers, not thinking that what they do is “good enough” for the people they teach.

Being able to communicate and thoroughly enjoy people is also very important. If you have to pretend to be friendly then teaching golf is going to be a tough business!

IGPN: What would be the biggest tip you could give a PGA Professional looking for a new job or trying to develop their skills?

Craig: You have to sell yourself! What can I offer this Golf Academy? Am I good with kids? Not all pros are. Can I teach better players? Can I teach teams? Do I just want to teach private lessons?

Everybody has their strengths and when hiring I look for someone who can give me something that I don’t have.

I also like having different personalities in the Academy, some people like a Professional who talks a lot, others are happy the less they say. Some Professionals are great with groups and entertaining people, others are happy to go the whole day just having one student per hour in front of them. There is a niche for everyone and you just have to find it.


For more information about Craig and West Golf visit www.craigwest.de or contact office@west-golf.com.

This article originally featured in International Golf Pro News. Visit the IGPN Page to find out more and subscribe for free.

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PGA Professional Spotlight: Craig West (PGA of Germany)
How to Identify & Demonstrate Your Skills http://www.pgae.com/ask/how-to-identify-demonstrate-your-skills/ Mon, 14 Nov 2016 22:44:51 +0000 Coaching4Careers http://www.pgae.com/?p=10357 Your CV is not the place to be modest! It is usually the initial and is sometimes the only opportunity you have to create a positive impression and will be the]]>

Your CV is not the place to be modest! It is usually the initial and is sometimes the only opportunity you have to create a positive impression and will be the thing that gets you an interview – or not.

The trick is to establish a strong sense of what you have to offer without being boastful and making grand, empty claims. The way to achieve your goal of impressing employers and making them want to meet you is to back up your claims with hard evidence. Don’t just say you are good at something; provide examples to show you are.

Therefore, the most effective CVs are those that have a strong Skills evidence. Past experience and application of skills is a good indicator for employers of your potential abilities and actions. This focuses attention on what you can do, have done and are likely to do.

It is a good idea to back up your claim that you possess excellent skills in, for example, communication by giving specific examples of the particular form of communication you have used, where (context) and why (for what purpose and for whom). Try to start each bulleted point with a verb to emphasise real life experience. Follow with an example from work, study or extra-curricular activities. For example:

Skills

Communication

  • Presented reports to tutorial group of 20 about research findings in Economics
  • Wrote articles for university magazine about mountain-walking club activities
  • Liaised with customers of various backgrounds at Tesco’s Supermarket as part-time cashier for 3 years

Teamwork

  • Co-operatively planned work schedules with four staff at JJB Sports
  • Negotiated with colleagues regarding task allocation for major projects at university
  • Played an active role in attaining customer service goals at Tesco’s

What skills do you have?

If you are really not sure, as opposed to being modest, perhaps you could ask friends, family and colleagues or speak to a careers coach . A personal skills audit might suggest the following. Note sub-sections of the major skill areas and use them as a guide to the bullet points you could include.

Communication

  • Presenting information and ideas in written form
  • Editing
  • Giving and receiving feedback
  • Explaining
  • Active listening and asking clarifying questions
  • Expressing ideas, feelings and opinions
  • Speaking fluently and accurately
  • Foreign language competence
  • Persuading and influencing
  • Negotiating
  • Non-verbal communication

Flexibility

  • Attitude to new tasks
  • Readiness to change
  • Enthusiasm
  • Ability to transfer skills
  • Commitment to ongoing improvement
  • Desire to learn new skills
  • Acceptance of constructive criticism

Teamwork

  • Ability to work co-operatively
  • Delegating skills
  • Constructive confrontation and resolution
  • Empathising
  • Recognising and valuing difference

Resilience

  • Coping with uncertainty
  • Dealing with difficult people
  • Ability to work under pressure
  • Ability to set and achieve goals

Assertiveness

  • Decision making Problem solving
  • Independence
  • Leadership
  • Level of ambition
  • Inclination to initiate ideas and plans

Entrepreneurship

  • Self-promotion
  • Ability to create opportunities
  • Networking skills
  • Customer focus Business acumen

Some of these sub-headings could be major skills themselves, such as Negotiating and Leadership. Some elements may fit under more than one skill. You will have to make choices about how best to use your material. Be guided by the Key Selection Criteria for specific jobs as your aim is to show how your skills fit with the employer’s needs.

When describing your skills, it is possible to ‘value-add’ by making reference to aspects of your experience and your personal qualities, interests and values. This can provide a lot of information about you in a very brief and concise way. For example, ‘Wrote articles for magazines about mountain-walking club activities’ informs readers about your interest, skill and success in writing as well as your active, healthy and sociable lifestyle. These are highly valued traits in the workplace and they have been communicated efficiently and effectively.

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How to Identify & Demonstrate Your Skills