PGAs of EuropeBlogs – PGAs of Europe http://www.pgae.com Home of the PGAE Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:55:30 +0000 en-gb hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.8.3 “If Disney Ran Your Hospital…The Things You Would Do Differently” http://www.pgae.com/ask/if-disney-ran-your-hospital-the-things-you-would-do-differently/ Fri, 27 Oct 2017 07:00:05 +0000 Tony Bennett http://www.pgae.com/?p=20277 "Author Fred Lee gives his advice on the five behaviours that customers really value in those who provide them with services..."]]>

On my latest read of the thought provoking, “If Disney Ran Your Hospital: 9 1/2 Things You Would Do Differently”, author Fred Lee, gives his advice on the five behaviours that customers value in those who provide them with services.

Fred observes that hospital patients judge their experience not only by the way they are treated for the disease but also, and more importantly, by the way, that they are treated as a person…

If Fred is right, and incidentally I think that he is, and if this concept transfers across into golf, which I think it does, then the ‘how’ is perhaps more important than the ‘what’? This is an essential point for all, coaches, managers, and leaders to recognise. By the way, the great ones do; that is one reason that they are great.

Content, or perhaps we should call it knowledge, can be learned. In fact, content can be learned by almost anyone on almost any subject. Certainly, there is always content to learn or be updated on, that is the nature of progress. Often people have a fascination for content, and yet they have a hard time sharing that knowledge in a way that can make a difference in the life of someone else. I believe that it is possible to learn enough content for whatever role you have in a short period of time to become good at almost any subject. Learning to share that knowledge however is altogether different.

Back to Fred Lee and his five behaviours. Fred conveniently created the acronym S.H.A.R.E. Essentially these behaviours boiled down to the following values: using initiative, being part of a team, understanding the customer’s feelings, treating them with courtesy and making sure that communication is open and honest.

  • S – Sense people’s needs before they ask (initiative)
  • H – Help each other out (teamwork)
  • A – Acknowledge people’s feelings (empathy)
  • R – Respect the dignity and privacy of everyone (courtesy)
  • E – Explain what is happening (communication)

So if the ‘how’ is so important then how can golf focus more on how to share experience and knowledge so that it is relevant, timely and useful? There are many answers to this question, and I would love to hear your thoughts on the subject.

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“If Disney Ran Your Hospital…The Things You Would Do Differently”
Something to Sell & No-One to Buy http://www.pgae.com/ask/something-to-sell-no-one-to-buy/ Thu, 28 Sep 2017 08:01:31 +0000 Tony Bennett http://www.pgae.com/?p=11522 Tony Bennett explores how the principles of custom fitting could be applied to all services in golf ensuring they fit the needs of the consumer...]]>

On my last visit to the opticians, the doctor fitted lenses to meet the needs of my eyes. Likewise when I go to the shoe shop or buy a suit, these products are fitted to me.

I recently read the latest edition of International Golf Pro News, which featured some excellent articles on club fitting and other such contributions on how a personalised solution often saves money, time, frustration and so on.

Surely fitting cannot be confined to just products can it? What about services, can they also be fitted to meet the needs of the consumer? Of course, they can, airlines have changed to offer choice in the level of services that we want.

We can book a specific seat, choose the number of bags to take, have insurance or not. Hotels offer a choice of breakfast with the room, newspapers and late check out. Gymnasiums offer access at certain times of certain days. Internet and mobile phone providers offer different download speeds and call tariffs. The list is endless.

The goal, is for the consumer to participate to the level that meets their needs, satisfies their desire and is a comfortable fit with their priorities, lifestyle, and other commitments.

There is nothing much wrong with the sport. A simple definition could be that you take a stick and hit a ball to a target that is in, on or above the ground. People have been doing it for years and it has a fair level of challenge if we play from the most suitable distance.

In recent times golf has started to change, but for so long effectively it has said, “this is our sport, this is how you will consume it and these are the rules of that engagement.” This attitude has shaped public opinion.

It is the same as going to a shop and being told that we must adapt to size 44 shoes or a 52 jacket, “just spread your toes or puff out your chest if the size is too big, or vice versa if the size is too small”. Sure someone with size 44 feet and a 52 chest thinks that everything is perfect, you can hear them say “why doesn’t everyone shop here”? I am sure that everyone else will be less than fulfilled and may well go elsewhere to have their needs satisfied.

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Could we offer consumers more choice in how they engage with the game? Certainly we have asked many non-golfers why they want to play, but have we listened to their answers and acted upon their perspectives?

A very good friend of mine, when asked what is the most important language for doing business, says without hesitation, “my customer’s language.” She is not referring to any one of the more than 6,000 mother tongues that a quick search on the internet reveals, but instead to the narrative that her customers use.

What is important to them, resonates and builds rapport? Sometimes we can know our product or service so well that we really do have something to sell, but if we do not become relatable to others, then we will likely have no-one to buy.

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Something to Sell & No-One to Buy
Technology in Golf Coaching – What’s Next? http://www.pgae.com/ask/technology-in-golf-coaching-whats-next/ Wed, 30 Aug 2017 06:01:37 +0000 Aston Ward http://www.pgae.com/?p=19149 We explore the ever-evolving world of coaching technology and what might be making its way to the lesson bay, golf course or swing room sometime in the future..]]>

I am very lucky to be in the position where I can mix my passions for technology, communications and innovation together with my biggest passion, golf, and my knowledge of coaching as a PGA Professional.

Because of this I sit in the middle of various areas of the industry where I can get a good view of what is happening when it comes to embracing technology and looking at innovative ways to continually advance our profession and the coaching process.

Barely a day goes by without an announcement of an upgrade or introduction of a new piece of equipment that could make a golfer better (or ideally simply enjoy themselves more), and it’s exciting to think where this could go in the future.

Now, as an opening caveat, I no longer coach students as part of my job, but I am exposed to a lot of great coaches who have dedicated their lives to improving golfers’ experiences. So whilst I may not be directly using coaching equipment on a daily basis, I can appreciate the technology behind them and their practical applications.

In speaking with many of these coaches, there is something that continually comes up when you discuss technology – data capture.

The level of detail and sheer quantity of data that we can capture about a golf swing is incredible. Technologies such as launch monitor/radar flight and ball-roll tracking devices, hi-speed camera analysis, and the myriad of other options on the market, mean you can now analyse every parameter imaginable when getting the ball into the hole. And, assuming the user is appropriately trained, this can turn into a very tangible benefit to the end-user.

Previously we featured the Strokes-Gained metrics developed by Dr Mark Broadie that utilises the PGA Tour’s ShotLink® data in which every single shot played in PGA Tour events is recorded into an open-access pool of information that academics can make use of.

This detailed level of data capture has meant that every single aspect of a player’s round can be analysed and new and improved metrics for performance have been created.

With the continued rollout, pun intended, of golf simulators and intelligent, customisable simulated environments, combined with Augmented Reality (AR) technology, we now have ways of mirroring golf course conditions like never before, making coaching more realistic and contextually applicable.

Where Next?

Simulating golf course conditions leads nicely into the potential innovations that we could see in the future.

One thing I think could have huge potential uses would be virtual reality (VR) – imagine standing in a bay, putting on a headset and methodically planning your way around your next golf course of choice.

This could be something that helps the transition of elite amateurs to tour events – often players with little experience of the ‘big stage’ can let things get on top of them. The incredibly immersive experience of VR could help train players to overcome their nerves, ignore the distractions and perform better under pressure by recreating the conditions they could feel. Granted, nothing will ever replace the real thing but this would be a great start.

The future of data-capture looks to be about expanding our awareness and knowledge of areas of the sport that were previously nothing more than theory. We already have equipment with built-in sensors but I can see a future [that is not too far away] where there are completely non-invasive methods of gathering the same data Trackman can for example, but without the need for any external equipment to be setup, with data streaming live and wirelessly to receivers both on and off the course.

I can also see this extending to more wearable equipment that is less intrusive in the practice or practicing or playing (think a biomechanics analysis product that is nothing more than a normal base layer for example with no discernable difference to a normal item of clothing).

Right now anyone can go out and measure their vital statistics using something like an Apple Watch and the relevant apps, but perhaps in future we won’t even need to put anything on, or if we do it will be more akin to wearing a temporary tattoo than an accessory like a watch.

Perhaps a much bigger question to pose from all of this is what will be done with this data – the more you capture, the more you need to process it, and ultimately it needs to be useful to coaches and then to their students.

What will certainly need to happen, no matter what might come in the future, is for the education of coaches to go hand-in-hand with the technological advancement to ensure these fantastic tools are not purely a marketing ploy but are actually beneficial and valuable to their students.

PGA Professionals have a responsibility to keep up with the latest changes in coaching methods to ensure they a) provide what their students want and need, and b) they don’t get left behind when others could be helping golfers play better and enjoy themselves more.


This article originally featured in International Golf Pro News. Visit the IGPN Page to find out more and subscribe for free.

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Technology in Golf Coaching – What’s Next?
Three Years of Curating International Expertise in IGPN http://www.pgae.com/ask/three-years-of-curating-international-expertise-in-igpn-2/ Tue, 29 Aug 2017 15:00:32 +0000 Ian Randell http://www.pgae.com/?p=19608 Issue 36 of IGPN marks a great point in the history of our digital magazine – its third anniversary of providing interesting, relevant and useful content...]]>

Issue 36 of IGPN marks a great point in the history of our digital magazine – its third anniversary since we revamped a simple monthly newsletter into a fully interactive and digital-only magazine.

IGPN still continues its mission of providing interesting, relevant and useful content to our Member Country PGAs and their individual PGA Professional Members.

We have had contributions from across golf and many other sports and industries. Not just from within Europe, but from around the world. And from PGA Professionals and a wide variety of experts, academics and figureheads.

This 36th Issue looks at an area that is, and will likely remain, at the core of what a PGA Professional does – coaching.

We have expert input from our John Jacobs Award for Teaching & Coaching Winner and coach to numerous European Tour and Ryder Cup players, Mike Walker, world-renowned coach, David Leadbetter, and our 5-Star Professional Award winner, Alan Walker, as well.

This information is designed to educate, inform and inspire and is an excellent example of the type of content we are working hard to develop and the direction in which our communications strategy is headed.

We must also remember that coaching is not just limited to the driving range or the playing lesson – we must continue to coach ourselves and our peers to advance all of our skills and become better and better at what we do.

A quick glance at the variety of information on our A.S.K. platform at www.pgae.com/ask will immediately show what we mean with content looking at the coaching golf to all manner of abilities, but also coaching and development information about growing the game, careers, productivity, business, marketing, and much more.

This information, together with the delivery and spread of IGPN, enables us to support our Member Country PGAs with their advancement of their PGA Professionals by curating international expertise and making it open and available to those who wish to make use of it.

We will continue to develop our communications into the future across an ever-changing technological landscape, and IGPN will always be a fundamental part of that.

As a final point, it would be remiss of us not to mention Sergio Garcia and his phenomenal win at Augusta National. It was difficult to pick sides on the final day as he and Justin Rose battled it out but whilst Justin would no doubt be a worthy owner of a green jacket, we were all delighted to see Sergio break through as a major champion. Hopefully this is just the beginning…!

If you would like to contribute to A.S.K. or IGPN then we invite you to share this with Aston Ward at aw@pgae.com and hope that you will join us in developing our Member Countries in Issues of IGPN, and the years ahead.

This article originally featured in International Golf Pro News. Visit the IGPN Page to find out more and subscribe for free.

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Three Years of Curating International Expertise in IGPN
1st Schools Championship in Lebanon Creates a New National Buzz Around the game! http://www.pgae.com/news/1st-schools-championship-in-lebanon-creates-a-new-national-buzz-around-the-game/ Wed, 05 Jul 2017 10:33:41 +0000 Mark Taylor http://www.pgae.com/?p=19246 After a successful first visit to Lebanon within the ‘R&A Working for Golf’ remit earlier in the year, we (The...]]>

After a successful first visit to Lebanon within the ‘R&A Working for Golf’ remit earlier in the year, we (The PGAs Europe) were requested to help organise and implement a Schools Championship for students, parents and train the workforce in succession management to facilitate future Schools Championships in conjunction with the Lebanese Golf Federation and Golf Club of Lebanon.

The Schools Championship proved a huge success with over 70 children attending the day at Golf Club Lebanon, Beirut, the children aged between 6 and 11 years represented six schools which had all received prior coaching through the Lebanese Golf Federations’ ‘Golf in Schools Programme’.

The event which removed the barriers to participation by inviting teachers, parents and friends of the participating children, coaching taster sessions were also delivered to attending parents whilst the event took place. Further coaching offers and entry level memberships were available along with general information on golf and its many benefits, including tours of the golf clubhouse and golf course.

The three hour event showcased golf to VIP guests and high ranking Government officials including the Minister of Tourism and the assistant to the Lebanese Sports Minister being also in attendance…The blistering midday heat did require more Parasols to be brought in for the dignitaries though!!

As desired the event aided in changing the negative political perception of golf in Lebanon, also empowering parents and local officials to view how much fun golf can be, alongside all of the many health and social benefits that golf can offer. This was ultimately justified in the Golf Club Lebanon securing an indefinite extension to the lease of the land from the Aviation Authorities. Both Club and Federation are now better positioned to continue to move forward with their business plan – with the future of their only facility to date secured.

Upon interviewing attending parents they were amazed at the location and readily stated that they didn’t even know that the Golf Club existed, with the demand for green space increasing as housing developments continue to monopolise the area, they all suggested that golf would provide an excellent activity in which all the family could participate in beautiful surroundings.

We were able to attract coverage from local TV stations and newspapers who later wrote a full page article on the event, again another first here as golf received its first full page mention in the Lebanese National Press!!

Such events continue to justify how important it remains for Federations and Golf Facilities to reach out and engage the local community, developing support and relationships with both the community and political stakeholders…more importantly to shift golfs’ stereotypical perception and increase participation in our sport to new players of all ages. Both The Federation and Golf Club have been inundated with enquiries since the event, attaining new sponsorship opportunities, recruiting new schools to their programme and participants of all demographics to their club coaching and membership offers.

Please contact The PGAs Europe if you would like further information or assistance on such events.

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1st Schools Championship in Lebanon Creates a New National Buzz Around the game!
PR & Marketing – Showing Your Innovative Side http://www.pgae.com/news/igpn-news/pr-marketing-showing-your-innovative-side/ Sat, 03 Dec 2016 14:31:14 +0000 Aston Ward http://www.pgae.com/?p=10674 My job title is Communications manager. But it is very fair to say I am a marketer. I deal with marketing and Public Relations (PR) everyday in various differ]]>

My job title is Communications manager.  But it is very fair to say I am a marketer.  I deal with marketing and Public Relations (PR) everyday in various different ways.

Whether it is promoting a tournament, curating content from contributors, adding posts to our social media presences, or creating content around our education and golf development work, it is undoubtedly marketing.

We see, hear and touch (and often taste smell) marketing all the time, and the world of golf is no exception to this.  Ever walked into a pro shop and been hit with offers on the latest gear?  Ever been playing and at the halfway house you wonder why there is a fan directing the smell of bacon out across the ninth green?  How about winning a prize in a tournament that’s been donated by an equipment manufacturer?

What I really like about marketing (to talk about it in very general terms) is that it can really be simple, clean and effective.

PR stunts and activities are often some of the simplest (and most fun) ways of generating interest in something and getting people talking – and that’s what PR is really all about.  Here are some examples:

The ALS ‘Ice Bucket Challenge’

Simple concept – you film yourself being doused in ice cold water, you donate to the cause, and you nominate three others to do the same and so on.   [You can view our Chief Executive, Ian’s challenge below:]

Here the marketing focus was on generating funds and encouraging people to share that message through social media.  The ALS Association went from a previous year of $1.7 million in donations to $13.3 million.

Tiger Woods Hits a Ball From Europe to Asia

To promote the Turkish Airlines World Golf Final in 2013, Tiger took to Istanbul’s Bosphorus Bridge and after closing one side from traffic he launched a ball across the bridge.

It might have caused chaos at rush hour in Istanbul but the stunt went all over the world generating a huge amount of PR for the event and for Turkish Airlines who are renowned for working with the biggest stars.

Bubba Watson and Oakley Make a Hovercraft…

Bubba has form in this area – barely a week goes by where his sponsors have made use of his personality and liveliness to promote products and services.  Two years ago Bubba teamed up with Oakley to create Bubba’s very own fully operational hovercraft golf cart.

In the video he wears Oakley product but, as with many things like this, it’s not about the product.  It’s about creating something that is fun, shareable and gets people talking.

It was released ahead of the 2013 Masters where Bubba would hope to defend his 2012 title and to date has had almost 9 million views.

Creating your own hovercraft might be a step too far but it is always worth looking out for examples and see how you could apply the principles to your business, club or brand.

You might not reach millions but it can be a cost effective way of showing a fun and innovative side to a business and activating PR (stunts or otherwise) could well generate excellent quality interest in what you do.

Seen any good examples of golf PR?  Feel free to send then to aw@pgae.com.


My Reading List

  • ‘How Topgolf Flipped The Traditional Driving Range Model And Created A New Category Of Entertainment’ [Forbes.com] – http://eur.pe/1wUdQI6
  • Donald Trump: I’m Huge!’ [GolfDigest.com] – http://eur.pe/1MlTxoy
  • ‘Public Relations Tips and Tricks for Your Business’ [Inc.com] – http://eur.pe/184KH13
  • ‘My top tip for a great speech – Richard Branson’ [Virgin.com] – http://eur.pe/1x8Y2f7
  • ‘The psychology of Web design: How colours, typefaces and spacing affect your mood’ [TheNextWeb.com] – http://eur.pe/1ELQs06
  • ‘7 Goal-Setting Tips and Strategies for Social Media Marketers’ [Blog.Bufferapp.com] – http://eur.pe/1GyBrkH

This article originally featured in International Golf Pro News. Visit the IGPN Page to find out more and subscribe for free.

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PR & Marketing – Showing Your Innovative Side
The Future of Golf Development http://www.pgae.com/ask/the-future-of-golf-development/ Thu, 01 Dec 2016 10:34:47 +0000 Tony Bennett http://www.pgae.com/?p=17336 "Despite years of gloomy forecasts from commentators and consumer surveys on the popularity of the game, golf will survive, and I believe it will thrive..."]]>

Despite several years of gloomy forecasts from commentators and consumer surveys on the popularity of the game, golf will survive, and I believe that it will thrive.

Golf will thrive because of the open air environment in which the game is consumed. Golf supports moderate physical activity, satisfying social interaction, distraction from the never ending roller coaster of life’s ups and downs, and not least the game offers a personal challenge.

The game is fundamentally one in which, you take a stick, to hit an object to a target, that is in, on, or above the ground.

Golf is not only a game but also an industry. An industry that ‘services the game‘. Be mindful of those three words – ‘services the game‘.

Without doubt, the game and the industry must be aligned to deliver an experience that men and women want to consume in the way that they want to consume it. Golf should entertain, challenge, and above all be an enjoyable experience. Even though the game and the industry must work together, the game should not become a service provider to the industry.

From this standpoint, there are many questions that continue to attract my attention, two of which are as follows:

Q1.

Imagine if we drop a handful of clubs and balls into a remote part of the Amazonian Rain Forest, where the villagers had never heard of Tiger Woods, and there were no TV or golf magazines. What game would they invent?

Would the villagers design a game where they take a stick, to hit an object to a target, that is in, on, or above the ground? Perhaps so. Would it be the same as we find in the some 200+ golf playing nations in the world? Would it have four par fives and four par threes on a 6,000m + course? Would it have miles of buggy paths and two starting points and finishing points, each near to a clubhouse?

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Q2.

Imagine that the golf ball travelled just 30% of the distance of the current ball. What effect would that have on the game? I suspect very little. Golf would still entertain, challenge, and above all be an enjoyable experience. I do however think that such a change would change the industry.

Certainly, courses could be made that were just 30% of the current length. So 2,000 metres would offer the same challenge as we have now over a much longer course. Golf course developers would need less land, and so potentially less investment; the course would perhaps be easier to design, certainly easier and cheaper to construct and maintain. Smaller parcels of land could be more easily found near to areas of population, so making the game more accessible. Would golf take less time on this shorter course? Is it reasonable to expect that if the ball travelled just 30% of the ‘normal’ distance, then it would also only go 30% of the distance into trouble? Perhaps there would be less time spent looking for golf balls? Would this form of golf become both a quick way for established golfers to play a few holes and at the same time be a simple but effective way for newcomers to be introduced to the game?

Softball in the US, has legions of participants, soft tennis and soft cricket, all forms of the mainstream sport, have introduced a ball to make their game more accessible. Could this simple act give golf a much-needed boost to reach new communities? The commentators say that golf needs to be more accessible, less expensive, quicker and easier. Perhaps a ball that travels significantly less distance will help.

In any case, I advise continually questioning why we do what we do, and also how we do it. Perhaps the answers will be surprising.

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The Future of Golf Development
[PODCAST] 6 Ways to Leverage Social Media & the Internet in Your Job Search http://www.pgae.com/ask/6-ways-to-leverage-social-media-the-internet-in-your-job-search/ Tue, 01 Nov 2016 11:35:19 +0000 Aston Ward http://www.pgae.com/?p=13746 Here are some tips to promote yourself better online and ensure a search of your name makes it more likely that you will be hired…]]>

In the 21st century the job-seeking process is complex and quick.  A career path can present itself to you in the blink of an eye, and can disappear just as quickly.

The development of platforms such as LinkedIn have shown that it is not just a paper CV that shows off who you are and what you can do.  It’s now possible to find out every bit of detail needed about a potential employee to make an educated decision as to whether they should get a job or not.

It is widely accepted that employers will likely Google an applicant as soon as they get their name.  What comes up in the search can be a window into their lives – whether you like it or not.  To ensure your results are ones that play in your favour, here are some tips to promote yourself better online and ensure a search of your name makes it more likely that you will be hired…

1. Google Yourself

The best place to start – do what an employer might do (ideally on a different computer than your own to see what someone else might see).

This will show you what they might see and could give you a good place to start when identifying where you are visible and what you should do about it.

2. Optimise Your LinkedIn Profile (Or Create One First!)

Firstly, if you are not on LinkedIn then you’re doing it wrong. Join LinkedIn.  It is a fantastic [FREE] resource where you can lay down as much or as little information about yourself, connect with people you know and people you want to know, and ultimately use as a live, digital and interactive CV.

Second, make sure your profile is complete using LinkedIn’s built-in step-by-step guide, add a great photo and take your time on your bio.  Then get connecting – sync your account with your phone or contacts and start by adding people you know.  Then once you have a network the platform will automatically start suggesting jobs and new connections for you – then you can start to action these connections and see where leads might come from.

3. Write a Blog

What better way to express yourself and show-off your expertise and knowledge in your area than writing about it.  You can write anything you want and tailor it to your intended are of work to show a) that you care about what you do/want to do, b) are knowledgeable and have an opinion on it, and c) you are computer/digitally savvy enough to get out there and set it up [but don’t worry it’s actually pretty easy to do with services such as WordPress and Tumblr].

4. Check Your Settings

Go through all of your social accounts and check your privacy settings – you may be happy for someone to discover your Facebook profile through a Google search, but are you happy that they can look at your 10-year old photos from University parties? Probably not.

Settings can often be tucked away or a little tough to root out, but platforms nowadays have great flexibility and control for their users when it comes to privacy – take time to work out what the different on and off switches mean.

5. Make the Most of Your Biography

Your Twitter bio, LinkedIn short biography and any other place where you can add a public biography are what people will see first.  Take time to make this as good as possible – you shouldn’t judge a book by its cover, but people often do anyway so make sure yours looks great.

6. Reverse Engineer The Search

Work out what an employer might look at that is connected to you – go through the process yourself and make sure everything is as you wish at each stage of a search.  Think about what they want to see and tailor your profiles to that.

Plus, turn the tables on a potential employer and look at their company profiles, connect with people from that company, or even explore their LinkedIn profiles.  They will no doubt do it to you, so you can do it to them.  Going into an interview with knowledge and info on the bosses, co-workers or interviewees will almost certainly be useful in your search.

This article originally featured in International Golf Pro News. Visit the IGPN Page to find out more and subscribe for free.

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[PODCAST] 6 Ways to Leverage Social Media & the Internet in Your Job Search
5 Ways To Blow Your Custom Fitting Trumpet http://www.pgae.com/ask/5-ways-to-blow-your-custom-fitting-trumpet/ Mon, 05 Sep 2016 07:01:52 +0000 Aston Ward http://www.pgae.com/?p=11399 How can you promote your custom fitting expertise and services to improve the bottom line AND your reputation?]]>

Custom fitting is an area of golf that fascinates me – I’ve been lucky to work with some of the best club fitters and builders out there and the knowledge they have given me is fantastic.

One of my previous jobs was at Precision Golf in Surrey, UK, as Marketing Manager. During that time I learnt some useful lessons about how to promote/market custom fitting as a service that I will share here.

1. Focus on Improvement

Ultimately the biggest benefit a person will get from having their equipment fitted to them is improvement of their game – they should be better able to play to the best of their ability knowing that the equipment they are using is not holding them back.

But improvement means different things to different people – make sure you look at all the benefits they could get. It could be that they achieve better performance, which could ultimately lead to a drop in their handicap. But equally the most important thing to someone could purely be the ability to enjoy their game – increased likelihood of hitting good shots or doing what they plan to do might not necessarily make them score massively better but it might allow them to have more fun. Speak to your clients to find out what their motivation was and align your marketing with these.

2. Promote Skills, Knowledge & Experience

Whether you have PGA Professionals or professional club fitters carrying out your fitting sessions you should shout about their knowledge, their certifications, their amount of experience and successes. Framed in the correct way, shouting about all of this does not have to be big-headed, but can be a genuine reflection of the service you can offer.

3. Case Studies

As has been shown throughout many areas of marketing and advertising, you can say how good you are as much you want, people will still give value to the views of their peers over what you say.

Case studies are a great way of showing how your services have benefitted people just like your prospective customers. Focusing on different types of players (e.g. male/female, pros/amateurs, etc.) allows you to develop examples of how you have helped people before and the types of benefits they can achieve.

This shows that you can practice what you preach and there are real-life examples of people who will support that.

4. The Gift of Choice

Tell people about how many options you have to offer them. Clients interested in custom fitting want to know how many options you can offer them because this is a good indicator of how specific you will be with their specification choices.

5. Show You Care

Something I think many custom fitting outfits could improve upon are their aftercare services. If a customer is engaged enough to want to have their clubs tailored to them then it is likely they will want this to continue in the future, especially in order to get the most out of what are often substantial investments.

Do not just sell a custom fitting session – combine it with a follow-up appointment of some kind – even a 10 minute check when they have received their new equipment and have had a chance to get used to it. You can promote that a) you care about their game and b) they will get the most out of their investment.

If you have any other ways of promoting your services then I would love to hear about them – you can contact me at aw@pgae.com.

This article originally featured in International Golf Pro News. Visit the IGPN Page to find out more and subscribe for free.

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5 Ways To Blow Your Custom Fitting Trumpet
Promoting Sustainability http://www.pgae.com/ask/promoting-sustainability/ Thu, 04 Aug 2016 07:23:26 +0000 Aston Ward http://www.pgae.com/?p=12095 Sustainability has been a buzzword for a few years now but how can individuals and businesses use the benefits of sustainable efforts to their advantage...?]]>

Sustainability has been a buzzword of sorts for a few years now but how can individuals and businesses use the benefits of sustainable efforts to their advantage when it comes to communications and marketing?

Publicity and brand value, as well as potential avenues in sponsorship and funding are just a few reasons that show why effort should be invested in communicating sustainability initiatives as effectively as possible – here are some ways to promote and market your activities:

Address Perceptions

Sustainability means different things to different people. Most will often automatically default to thinking of the environment, but there are various other dimensions such as societal and economical elements.

Their views on sustainability efforts may also be focused on the initial cost implications or potential lack of impact for the effort that goes into the activities.

Focus comms on explaining what sustainability is, how it affects your stakeholders, and what benefits will come from the activities you are undertaking. You could do this through FAQ (Frequently Asked Question) pieces, external case study examples of similar activations that have been successful, question and answer sessions, or video walkthroughs of plans/ideas.

Engage All Stakeholders

Create clear, easy to consume communications channels to engage with the stakeholders that will be influenced by your initiatives such as local governments, your customers/members, academy pupils, local residents surrounding your facility, the local golf community, etc.

Your best approach here would be to initially identify all the different stakeholders involved and find out what they want, what their concerns are, and how you can communicate with them effectively. Then you can build a plan about what messages go to which stakeholders and when.

You could then take that a step further and involve stakeholders at key points (e.g. inviting local government officials to milestone events, or running open evenings with members).

Be Transparent

2015 is seemingly a turning point for transparency in business – keeping people in the loop on what is happening and why will help them feel involved in the process ensuring understanding of actions and their impact.

Publishing reports or findings, regular updates by email, in-depth explanations of actions authored by key decision makers, and clear policies/standards will help your stakeholders stay informed.

Be Prepared

Prepare in advance for questions, queries, challenges and more from various stakeholders. Use the information gathered during stakeholder research to create a library of answers for people to use and tap in to.

The other key here is to make sure your entire team/staff are on-board and understand what is happening, how to explain it, and how to answer consistently so everyone is on-message.

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Shout About Your Good Work

Lastly, make sure you shout about the outcomes of the work as much as possible through articles, features, interviews and more. Contact local authorities or media outlets to show off how your business is promoting sustainability – you never know what sort of assistance, funding or business could be attracted when you get good PR and marketing behind your activities.

If you have any other ways of promoting sustainability initiatives then email them to aw@pgae.com

This article originally featured in International Golf Pro News. Visit the IGPN Page to find out more and subscribe for free.

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Promoting Sustainability
Turning Your Students and Members into Ambassadors for Golf & Its Health Benefits http://www.pgae.com/ask/turning-your-students-and-members-into-ambassadors-for-golf-its-health-benefits/ Tue, 31 May 2016 17:00:10 +0000 Aston Ward http://www.pgae.com/?p=15625 Creating & leveraging ambassadors and fans to promote golf's many benefits...]]>

Everyone in golf is in agreement – more golfers are good news for the sport. But to get there then it requires some joined up thinking from all of golf’s stakeholders.

These stakeholders include your very own army of students that you coach and members/visitors to your facilities, and leveraging this band of merry golfers can help golf’s cause, as well as your own.

As you will read in this issue of IGPN, there are many health and well-being benefits that come from taking part in the sport, so we’ll use these as a basis for getting your army on-board and spreading the gospel of golf…

Get All Your Staff Involved

You and your facility’s staff all need to be aligned with your plans and also embody exactly what you are after from your ambassadors. They need knowledge and information in order to reflect what you want to portray.

Every staff member that could have an interaction with a client or customer (and even those who might not) can be educated with top-line information about the benefits of golf to different demographics’ health and wellbeing.

Short, sharp bits of info that they can be armed with when speaking to people about the sport and why they should get involved.

Promote the Benefits in Your Facility and to your Clients

A key thing with getting people on the same page as you is ensuring they are aware of information and engaged with it.

Create some resources [the PGAs of Europe will have some soon for you to use as well] that you can use on noticeboards around your facility, or in your Pro Shop for example, that show the benefits of the sport. Materials like posters, infographics, leaflets, etc. are great items to get in front of people.

Having on-site information is the first step – then you need to get people engaged with the materials so including a section in regular email blasts to your databases can help support your actions and activities and can also allow you to share great examples of how golf is benefitting people in various different forms such as news items, feature articles or videos.

Create a Programme or Team

A great way of getting the message out there would be to build a team of ambassadors from your facility with people from key demographics represented.

A good place to start could be with you in the middle as the group leader and include a couple of members of staff from around the business along with a couple of males and females from differing ends of the age spectrum. Ideally these people will be the opinion leaders from the facility – when these people speak or act, others pay attention.

The individuals you pick should be willing to join in with the activity and embody the message you are trying to get across. They can act as on the ground troops for your armies to infiltrate their demographics and get the messaging out there to educate others and spread the word.

Activate Your Ambassadors

Once you have a team of ambassadors who are exemplifying your message then you need to activate them and leverage their knowledge, peer groups and influence within them.

For example you could have your more ‘youthful’ ambassadors promote a fun day or charity fair at the facility to their social groups and make sure that the event is on their level and of interest.

Or you could record some interviews or write a short blog post using your ambassadors as case studies to show how their social, mental and physical health might have benefitted from playing. This could go on your website, blog and shared on social media and you could even contact your local media to see if they would like to use the information in a piece about golf’s health benefits.

Once you have some ambassadors on your side then they can be a really useful asset to you to help promote the benefits of the sport as well as your own facility and services.

This article originally featured in International Golf Pro News. Visit the IGPN Page to find out more and subscribe for free.

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Turning Your Students and Members into Ambassadors for Golf & Its Health Benefits
9 or 90, Golf is a Sport For All… http://www.pgae.com/ask/9-or-90-golf-is-a-sport-for-all/ Mon, 30 May 2016 08:51:06 +0000 Ian Randell http://www.pgae.com/?p=15615 There are many benefits of being involved with golf - the Golf & Health Project will seek to verify these and explore the un-researched areas...]]>

Issue 29 of International Golf Pro News focuses on fitness – not only that, but also health & wellbeing, and the huge variety of benefits that can be gained from playing our glorious sport.

The PGAs of Europe are delighted to be playing our part in the Golf & Health Project that is currently underway, aiming to shine a light on those benefits and back them up with hard, peer-reviewed evidence.

One of these benefits that is widely known and agreed is that golf is a game for life that can incorporate both young and old whilst keeping them on a level playing field for all to enjoy.

Recently there have been a number of good examples but here are a couple of key ones…

Just last week we saw the rise and rise of England’s Danny Willett taking his first major championship and the first green jacket to land on European shoulders in 17 years. Whilst Danny might not be as much of a young-gun as the likes of Jordan Spieth or Bryson DeChambeau he is still a great example of a young athlete fulfilling his potential in the sport.

But did you notice who was up there in the final round of the Masters this year? None other than our 2015 Lifetime Achievement Award Winner, Bernhard Langer. Continuing to mature like a fine wine, Langer’s 58 years were far from a barrier to his performance throughout the week and was a great example of how a golfer can still be highly competitive not just amongst his peers on the Champions Tour, but also with the future legends of the game like McIlroy, Spieth and Day.

But it’s not just at the elite end of the game where there are some great life-long examples. Our friends at GolfForHer.com drew our attention to this fantastic story in the USA about The Los Verdes Golden Golfers at the Los Verdes Women’s Golf Club in California.

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If you are over 90 and a member of the club then you automatically become one of the club’s hall of famers – a ‘Golden Golfer’. They play 18 holes every Thursday from the junior tees to make the game as enjoyable as possible for them. They play on their terms to enjoy themselves and say the game offers exercise, social interaction, maths skills and humour.

“The fact that these gals are still swinging at 90-plus proves that golf is an ageless game.” Ginny Oreb, President of The Los Verdes Women’s Golf Club

We cannot wait to see more of the research findings that are coming out of the Golf & Health project. The research and work produced will give PGAs, their Member Professionals, and everyone involved in the sport, the tools they need to promote it to the outside world as being the most inclusive sporting activity out there.

I hope this Issue of IGPN gives you some insight into a variety of those health & wellbeing benefits, along with some really interesting areas of performance sport, coaching and sports science to really sink your teeth into the subject.

Enjoy the issue, get out on the course and stay healthy! After all as the Farahmand et al. (2009) study in Sweden has evidenced, golfers live five years longer!

Enjoy the issue and as always feel free to get in touch with Editor Aston Ward (aw@pgae.com) if you have feedback, ideas or would like to contribute to IGPN and A.S.K.

This article originally featured in International Golf Pro News. Visit the IGPN Page to find out more and subscribe for free.

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9 or 90, Golf is a Sport For All…
Research and critically analyse your WHY – Working Abroad the Smart Way http://www.pgae.com/ask/research-and-critically-analyse-your-why-working-abroad-the-smart-way/ Sun, 03 Apr 2016 15:51:08 +0000 Tony Bennett http://www.pgae.com/?p=14992 Why do you want to work abroad? What do you want to achieve? What do you want to experience? Your reason WHY is far more important than the how.]]>

Why do you want to work abroad? What do you want to achieve? What do you want to experience? Your reason WHY is far more important than the how.

Background check.

Do your homework when preparing to work abroad. Get a good understanding of the market that you are intending to enter. Research the internet, ask questions of people who have already made the move to find out what pitfalls are waiting for the unsuspecting and above all make sure that you, and those closest to you, know exactly what you hope to achieve by making the move. Get a feel for what that market really wants and then check that you are able to satisfy that demand.

Emerse yourself.

Visit the area to get a feel for the culture. Many people make the mistake of thinking that living in a new country is all great. Be assured that if you visit and stay in anything from a B&B to a five star hotel, it is nothing like living there. Of course it is great when your breakfast is served and you can go about your day like a tourist. No cooking or dishes to do, no beds to make, no forms to complete, (in another language) no tax, immigration or financial offices to visit and best of all a new exciting place to explore every day.

Avoid getting sucked into purely expat communities. Sure it is good to have people who have had a similar experience and have some inside knowledge of your newly adopted country. But guess what? Locals who were born and bred in the area know their way around even better. Enjoy the process of making friends with people who are not like you. After years of travel, I have friends of many nationalities and I have adopted some customs and traditions which are now my own.

A few words of the local language can really help. We all like to meet people who have made the effort to at least learn a few phrases in our native tongue. You don’t need to be grammatically correct in those first few months. Keep trying and you will be able to pick up enough of the language to make yourself understood.

Don’t compare.

Don’t compare or try to change people or processes. Comparing is just about the least productive thing that you can do with your time. The number of times I hear people say, “this is the way that we do it in…..”. Well guess what, if you notice that people here don’t do it the same as you did in your home county, there is probably a perfectly good reason. Find out, ask questions, seek answers as to how this method of doing things evolved. It will help you to understand the culture and to identify any part of the process that you might have an opportunity to tweak.

Make it your home.

Home is where your heart is. It is where the important things to you are. From the first day of arriving in a new country, try to make it your home. Create your own lifestyle, enjoy your new surroundings, make friends, follow a new football team, eat like the locals and emerge yourself in this new culture.

Whatever your baggage you will bring.

If you are not good at getting lessons in your home country, then there is no reason to think that you will all of a sudden become good at it in another. There are loads of things that we are not good at and so use the change of country as an opportunity to work on yourself to get good at the things you feel that you would like to improve.

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Research and critically analyse your WHY – Working Abroad the Smart Way
“…Everybody has talent, but ability takes hard work…” http://www.pgae.com/ask/everybody-has-talent-but-ability-takes-hard-work/ Mon, 07 Mar 2016 12:04:14 +0000 Ian Randell http://www.pgae.com/?p=14643 Whether you are a PGA Professional working at a golf facility or an individual working within a PGA, we are all very lucky to say we work in the ‘golf business’]]>

Dear Readers – welcome to the latest issue of International Golf Pro News, this time focused around the hugely broad subject of ‘business’.

Whether you are a PGA Professional working at a golf facility or an individual working within a PGA, we are all very lucky to say we work in the ‘golf business’. But with such a broad term it is easy to forget some of the key fundamentals that we are all involved with in some way – it might not be directly, but an understanding of how a business functions, grows and prospers is essential to maximise your value.

It is also possible to forget these basics after being involved with something for a long time or in one specific area of the business – time to reflect on all areas of your business and as always applying steps to improve them all through passion and hard work is the key to success. As the quote above from Basketball legend (and avid golfer) Michael Jordan says “Everybody has talent, but ability takes hard work”.

This issue of IGPN aims to provide a snapshot of articles across a variety of subjects that are important for people working in and/or running a business. You could even use it as a type of checklist to see how much you know about areas such as finance, human resources, commerciality, and marketing in your business.

None of us can offer the ultimate piece of advice for a business to make it succeed, but there are key things that you can get in place to give it the best chance of succeeding, all of which can be taken and moulded to fit your business.

It is especially important in our context of PGAs and businesses that their PGA Professionals operate in, when very often people wear many hats in an organisation. General Secretary, Membership Coordinator, and Head of Training – or Coach, General Manager, and Operations Manager.

Our hope is that this IGPN, along with a huge repository of information on the A.S.K. section of our website, can help you to create the most productive or profitable business possible. Managing your business effectively, keeping a track of its progress both financially and operationally, boosting productivity and efficiency, making it more attractive to sponsors/investors, and – something that I definitely feel is central to success – knowing how to build a great team of people around you to operate the business are all massively important.

Enjoy the issue and as always feel free to get in touch with Editor Aston Ward (aw@pgae.com) if you have feedback, ideas or would like to contribute to IGPN and A.S.K.

This article originally featured in International Golf Pro News. Visit the IGPN Page to find out more and subscribe for free.

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“…Everybody has talent, but ability takes hard work…”
6 Corporate Communications Questions to Ask Yourself http://www.pgae.com/ask/6-corporate-communications-questions-to-ask-yourself/ Mon, 07 Mar 2016 11:36:17 +0000 Aston Ward http://www.pgae.com/?p=14640 No matter how big your business, it will be communicating a message of some sort in some way. So how do you make sure you communicate the right things?]]>

No matter how big your business, it will be communicating a message of some sort in some way.  So how do you make sure you communicate the right things in the most appropriate and effective way?

As Communications Manager for the PGAs of Europe I am always looking to ensure our messaging is as effective as possible and to do so we often take a step back and ask ourselves some questions.  Here are 6 questions that you can ask to help establish if you are on the right track…

1. What is your brand and what does it stand for?

Have you ever really looked at your brand in detail?  Having a grasp on this is a real key to knowing how to communicate a message to your various stakeholders.  It provides things like context, tone of voice, direction and clarity.

Take the time to assess what your brand is from an overall ‘visionary’ and strategic outlook, all the way down to the nuts and bolts of what it looks and feels like.  This will help frame your comms and keep things consistent no matter the business’ size.

2. Who are you targeting?

Looking at your target audience broadly is sometimes overlooked, as it is often obvious to you who you are targeting.  But is this true throughout the business and with each and every piece of messaging that is sent out?

Messages that seem clear to you may not actually be clear to the desired recipient so be sure to assess the clear reasons that a message is going to someone, whilst also making sure it can be understood from their end.  This is where your research should come into play to help tailor information appropriately and fit in with your overall comms strategy.

3. Are you acting responsibly?

Corporate Responsibility has become more and more of a buzzword in recent years – it could be argued that in the past a business’ focus was quite often on the bottom line and very little else.  Making money was seen to be the ultimate goal above all else.

But in a world of complete connectivity and increasing transparency, businesses have been forced [and rightly so] to look at the social impacts to their operations and work.  Rather than pleasing the shareholders and few others, businesses now need to look at how what they do affects their customers, the environment, the community and employees.

Think about how each of your messages affects these groups not only financially but also socially.

4. How do you communicate internally?

Communicating to your internal stakeholders is just as important as communicating to the external ones.  Your employees are the action and mouthpiece of a business and they should all be on board.

How do you pass your key messages to employees, your board, or your managers?  Are they in the loop as much as they need to be and aware of what the overall organisational goals and strategy are?

Creating a corporate culture where sharing of information is central can lead to greater efficiency, shared understanding and ownership, and overall satisfaction.

5. How are you managing your Public Relations?

Are your messages getting to the right people?  Do you have someone who is getting those messages to the right people at the right time?

The delivery of your message to the outside world in the most effective way is key to serving your business’ interests so you must ensure that whomever looks after your PR is getting the right message across to the right people, whilst also reflecting a broader corporate message about the business’ overall strategy and positioning, along with its value to its stakeholders.

6. What happens if there is a problem?

Your business should have guidelines in place for your brand – how it can and can’t be used by various stakeholders in various forms – but are there guidelines for how the business and its stakeholders should something happen involving your business?

Again with information being more readily available and transparent, corporate communications has become more frequently associated with dealing with issues that affect the business and its stakeholders.  Make sure you have a plan (even if it is simply a checklist of actions to complete if something happens) should something happen that involves your business.

This article originally featured in International Golf Pro News. Visit the IGPN Page to find out more and subscribe for free.

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6 Corporate Communications Questions to Ask Yourself
Futurist For a Day – Preparing for Change By Thinking Ahead http://www.pgae.com/ask/futurist-for-a-day-preparing-for-change-by-thinking-ahead/ Tue, 19 Jan 2016 10:08:21 +0000 Ian Randell http://www.pgae.com/?p=13988 The first IGPN of the year is always a good opportunity to reflect on our Annual Congress, Gala Award winners, and International Team Championship, but also a c]]>

The first IGPN of the year is always a good opportunity to reflect on our Annual Congress, Gala Award winners, and International Team Championship, but also a chance to look ahead at the coming year.

During the Congress in December we took time to look back on the first 25 years of the PGAs of Europe as part of the anniversary celebrations, but we also took a prospective look forward.

So much has changed about the golfing landscape in the past 25 years – the Association has increased its membership from 13 countries to 37, in that time showing how golf has continued to spread across the continent – and so much has changed in the wider world as well. Think about the introduction of the Internet, email, social media, the ever-changing political situations across the planet, technological advancements around the world and more.

Futurists spend their time using what we know and where we have come from to work out where we might go next. So using some of the growth predictions and trends futurists have come up with, we put together our thoughts based on facts such as:

  • By 2028 62% of the global population will live in cities
  • Wearable technology will be controlled by thought and many jobs will be replaced by artificial intelligence
  • In 2028 1 in 3 people will live beyond 100 years of age

Using just this tiny handful of statements we considered what effect they might have on the PGAs of Europe, its member PGAs and golf in general – after some thought and discussion even these few things would be game-changing.

And like any good futurist would do we posed some questions:

  • How would golf cope with such a high percentage of its players living in heavily populated areas? What facilities would need to exist? What would the effect be on existing facilities? (We also speculated that these could perhaps be solved in part by projects such as France’s 2018 short courses or through new forms of urban golf facilities)?
  • How can golf be prepared for advancements in technology and communications, and how can it be ready to embrace new technologies as and when they come along?
  • Golf is a sport for life and as such is an aging population a great opportunity for golf to grow? And how can the PGA Professional and golf in general take advantage of this?

Of course foretelling the future is not always that accurate but speculating with educated guesses is never a bad thing. Take the upcoming golf season and 2016’s Majors – how will golf’s new big-three of Rory, Jordan and Jason follow up on their successes of last season.

Much like the European Ryder Cup Team too then… A glance at each week’s leaderboard on the European Tour reveals so many candidates for Darren Clarke’s team it could drive you mad trying to pinpoint a team any time soon – especially with the likes of some exciting young Europeans like Danny Willett, Matthew Fitzpatrick, Bernd Wiesberger, Andy Sullivan, Thomas Pieters to name but a few – which could result in the team looking very different to how it did at Gleneagles. The PGAs of Europe office has selected our picks for the team so we’ll reveal how close any of us were later in the year.

From all of us at the PGAs of Europe, best wishes for a happy and successful 2016!

This article originally featured in International Golf Pro News. Visit the IGPN Page to find out more and subscribe for free.

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Futurist For a Day – Preparing for Change By Thinking Ahead
3 Communications Trends For 2016 (And How They Might Affect You) http://www.pgae.com/ask/3-communications-trends-for-2016-and-how-they-might-affect-you/ Tue, 19 Jan 2016 09:36:43 +0000 Aston Ward http://www.pgae.com/?p=13982 If you think how much communications have changed in just the last 5 or 10 years then I’m sure you’ll agree it is not only massive but also tough to predict.]]>

If you think how much communications have changed in just the last 5 or 10 years then I’m sure you’ll agree it is not only massive but also tough to predict. We did our best at the Annual Congress with our ‘A Look Ahead’ presentation to speculate about the future and it got me thinking about what to expect even for just the coming year. Here are three things to watch out for…if you’re not watching for them already…

1. Continued Use of Mobile

Global usage of mobile Internet devices crossed over desktop usage in 2014 and continues to grow at a higher rate and there are now more devices on Earth than humans. By the end of 2016 Tablets will exceed 10% of global mobile data traffic, and by 2019 smartphones will reach the 75% of mobile data traffic milestone.

What does it mean?

  • Optimise your website for mobile/different screen sizes and orientations and think about how people will interact with it.
  • Any message you communicate, be it via email, website, social media, forum, intranet, etc. should also be easily read/consumed on any device.
  • Test, test, and test. Have due diligence in checking web pages, email communications, and social media updates across devices.

2. Marketing Automation

A trend expected to grow this year is automation (and to some extent personalisation) – the 2016 consumer is more attuned to messages that are personalised and relevant to them; they want to be engaged with, not sold to.

What does it mean?

  • You need to be collecting the right information, not necessarily more. When users sign-up/register/join you need to ensure you gather accurate data and also the information most relevant to you? Take a step back and ensure you gather only the relevant information you need and will actually use.
  • Look at the small things within your communications – for example can you add users’ names to mass mailouts (e.g. merge tags in Mailchimp) to personalise a message?
  • The importance of targeting has never been more important – is the message you’re sending relevant to all the people in your audience? If not then how can you break it down?

3. Content Continues to Dominate

The content marketing area of communications has really grown significantly showing people want to develop a relationship based on trust and relevancy with a brand or organisation. A survey in 2015 showed that 86% of B2B organizations have a strategic content marketing strategy, whilst another showed only 23% percent of consumers trust content from companies who they are not involved with, but if the source is a company they have a relationship with, that number nearly doubles to 43%.

What does it mean?

  • Develop a strategy to give direction to what you do. A strategy will let you work out why you might need to develop content, who it is targeted towards, and what it should do and be in order to meet those requirements.
  • Make sure you appeal to your users’ needs and wants (and do the research to find out what they might be).
  • Have patience – it takes time to build trust with an audience even if they are heavily invested in your brand or organisations already. Keep it consistent in terms of subject matter, frequency and distribution.

This article originally featured in International Golf Pro News. Visit the IGPN Page to find out more and subscribe for free.

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3 Communications Trends For 2016 (And How They Might Affect You)
Communications & Golf Development http://www.pgae.com/news/igpn-news/communications-golf-development/ Fri, 15 Jan 2016 16:16:36 +0000 Aston Ward http://www.pgae.com/?p=10735 Golf Development is the lifeblood of the PGAs of Europe and will continue to grow more and more important as time goes on.]]>

Golf Development is the lifeblood of the PGAs of Europe and will continue to grow more and more important as time goes on. 

We have many people working on various elements of developing golf across the continent and further afield including coaching, development of programmes, monitoring of standards etc.  But something I can assist with in my capacity as Communications Manager is two-fold:

1 – Communicating Best Practice Examples and Initiatives

Golf development activities are taking place all the time all over the world but it is safe to say that very few of them will be exactly the same.  Of course general concepts and ideas are followed but locally they will be heavily tailored to the market.

Where communications can help is in developing a library of good practice examples that can then be applied to other places – the best bits of one programme and the best of another could mix and be adapted to create a very effective activity somewhere else.

These resources can be collected and shared effectively with organisations that are interested in creating an initiative or programme with, for example, the assistance of the PGAs of Europe’s Golf Development Professionals and Education Committee.

2 – Raising Awareness of Development Activity

Communications then plays a part in sharing information and updates about development activities.  Using case studies and sharing success stories helps to bolster the resources mentioned earlier but it also gives coverage to specific initiatives that can help them.

A project or programme may also want to gain coverage to promote their work and its outcomes, promote the host facilities, the key supporters, etc.  Often programmes will be supported by commercial entities so promotion will give them coverage and hopefully spur on continued investment and support.

There are some excellent examples of golf development activities out there and plenty put a strong emphasis on promoting what they do.

A good example of strong promotion and coverage from an initiative is this week’s Drive, Chip & Putt Championship – The PGA of America, USGA and Masters Tournament’s nationwide youth golf development program final.

Of course three major organisations in the game have a lot of resources behind them but their methods of communication can still be learnt from and replicated.

Daily articles from the finals, blog posts, interviews with competitors, videos of the event, and fantastic imagery all make for a well formulated comms plan – take a look at www.drivechipandputt.com for examples of how to build content and communicate it around an initiative.

This article originally featured in International Golf Pro News. Visit the IGPN Page to find out more and subscribe for free.

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Communications & Golf Development
The Two Sides of Careers http://www.pgae.com/ask/the-two-sides-of-careers/ Thu, 17 Dec 2015 21:30:32 +0000 Ian Randell http://www.pgae.com/?p=13626 In any job opportunity there are two sides – the employer and potential employee. Much is made of the process of looking for a job and getting hired, but we of]]>

In any job opportunity there are two sides – the employer and potential employee.  Much is made of the process of looking for a job and getting hired, but we often overlook the employer’s task of finding the right person for a position.

Anyone working in any job will have been a part of this process at some point – whether you are the person searching for candidates, or one of the candidates making yourself as attractive as possible.

In this month’s issue of IGPN we try to balance careers knowledge and assistance not only for people on the hunt for their perfect job, but for those on the hunt for the perfect person as well.

PGA Professionals will all at some time in their career be on both sides – trying to find the right position for themselves to advance their career forward, whilst also looking to create teams that they can work with to be as effective as possible.  But you don’t necessarily have to wait until you’re the boss to get benefit from learning about the hiring process.

Inside this issue you’ll find out how to perform well in interviews with various techniques including controlling body language, how to invest in your career, and how to organise your job search.  But you’ll also find out how to make sure a potential hire fits in to your business’ culture and how to work out what factors matter most to you when hiring a new team member.

All of these things can be useful on both sides – as someone looking for a job, how useful would it be to have an insight into what someone might be looking for?  And as an employer, would it be useful to know what the body language of candidates is saying to you?  With any potential position it’s important to ensure both parties look at it from both sides to get the most out of it and ensure the right person gets hired for the right job.

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I’ve learnt that in the golf industry where quite often we’re selling people (it’s the same for coaching in many ways), that recruiting the right people who are going to fit in means not only will the business thrive but they will be happier and a darn sight easier to manage thus freeing up your time for other things.

I have also spoken before in about attitude over experience – ideally you would have both but I would always lean towards attitude if the context is right. It is far more difficult to try and shape the wrong person than get the right person in the first place.  Tools such as in-interview tasks where candidates perform a real-world task actually in the environment they might work in, or psychometric testing are things I have found useful in identifying the right people.

With PGA Professionals continuously rising to the top of businesses the importance of knowing how to hire and how to get hired has never been more important.  Hopefully this month’s IGPN will go some way at least to helping you achieve the most you can in your career and ensure the team around you is the most effective for the job and everyone’s well-being.

This article originally featured in International Golf Pro News. Visit the IGPN Page to find out more and subscribe for free.

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The Two Sides of Careers
The Future of Coaching – Tony Bennett http://www.pgae.com/ask/the-future-of-coaching/ Mon, 09 Nov 2015 11:40:29 +0000 Tony Bennett http://www.pgae.com/?p=10189 PGAs of Europe Director of Education & Membership, Tony Bennett, gives his thoughts on how coaching has changed in the past 15 years and where it could go in th]]>

PGAs of Europe Director of Education & Membership, Tony Bennett, gives his thoughts on how coaching has changed in the past 15 years and where it could go in the next…

For those of you old enough, can you remember when most people said that the earth was flat? ‘Flat-Earthers’ believed that the World was nothing like a spherical body and had varying theories about a wheel like shape surrounded by water.  These theories were once believed to be iron-clad, but were then disproven over time.

In the same vein I am sure that many PGA Professionals can cast their mind back to the turn of the millennium and think about the ball flight laws at that time.  If you were coaching in the year 2000, what was your coaching philosophy just those 15 years ago?

If you are developing as a coach, then I guarantee that you will think about some parts of coaching, technique, preparation or the use of technology very differently than you did even five years ago.

To think that nothing changes and everything is the same is naive.  Equipment changes, the playing conditions change and even the players’ mind-sets are very different than they were even just five years ago.

Based on that, making predictions for how coaching will change and the influence of technology anything further than five years in the future is pure crystal ball-gazing.  That said, I offer the following observations that could come into play:

  • The relationship between the coach and student will become more reliant on facilitating learning rather than teaching.
  • It will not be possible to quarantine a student from information or influence from other sources. The coach of the future will become a trusted advisor, a sounding board to validate or correct the student’s current thinking.
  • Progress of the student is not linear.  Successful coaches will recognise that on the road to the student’s goals there will be detours, roadblocks and potholes to be negotiated.
  • There is not a starting and finishing line.  Students will engage with the game on their own terms.  Some will start with the long game, some with short game and others with putting.  Many people will resist being fed into one end of a system and asked to progress through a series of pre-defined lessons.
  • Coaches will return to teaching people rather than teaching golf swings.
  • There is a huge disconnect between where a new student learns to swing the club and where they play the game.  The range cannot replicate the course and as such it is imperative that the new student gets to the course as soon as is practically possible.
  • There is an over-reliance on data capture devices, such as, video, force plates, ball launch monitors, 3D analysis systems.  That is not to say that technology is not good because when used properly it really is.  Many of these technological aids are tremendous, but it is only the operators that tend to love them.  Such equipment should be used more as a way to capture data, make a thorough diagnosis, prepare an intervention and assess progress, not used as a gimmick in untrained hands.
  • Finally, coaches will start to realise that the market for coaches to elite players is very small and that the big and more lucrative markets are with new and average players.  In most golf playing countries less than 10% of the population, and sometimes even significantly less, play so the untapped 90%+ offer a great opportunity.

To conclude I have no desire to be educated, no inclination to be taught and yet I have an insatiable appetite to learn.  Ask me if I want to be educated or taught how to play the saxophone and my answer is no.  Ask me if I want to learn how to play the saxophone and my response is a resounding yes.  For that, I will need an expert coach.


This article originally featured in International Golf Pro News. Visit the IGPN Page to find out more and subscribe for free.

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The Future of Coaching – Tony Bennett
Travel Broadens All Minds http://www.pgae.com/ask/travel-broadens-all-minds/ Wed, 16 Sep 2015 07:59:14 +0000 Ian Randell http://www.pgae.com/?p=12795 The old adage that ‘travel broadens the mind’ is undoubtedly true – venturing outside of your normal community and environment allows you to be exposed to diffe]]>

The old adage that ‘travel broadens the mind’ is undoubtedly true – venturing outside of your normal community and environment allows you to be exposed to different cultures, languages and ways of life.

I have been very fortunate throughout my career to be able to see the world as an integral part of my job and I believe that having an international perspective and experience and understanding of other cultures has benefitted me greatly both personally and professionally. Sharing knowledge and good practice across organisations and PGA Professionals by spending time with people from other PGAs, golfing organisations and PGA Professionals is at the heart of the operation of the PGAs of Europe.

With travel on our minds for this issue, the PGAs of Europe make it our business to provide opportunities for PGA Professionals to travel whether it be to compete in international tournaments or Pro-Ams, educational events such as the recent Coaches Circle in Bulgaria or purely to take trips with clients through the likes of our Corporate Partners, Golfbreaks.com, providing a world of opportunities.

Our tournament schedule continues to expand and it is fitting that we take a look at some of our fantastic event venues that we are lucky enough to have on our schedule.  We are thankful to them all for their hospitality and support in various ways and I hope that you get an opportunity to visit them either at one of our events or separately making use of the great deals many of these places have for PGA Professionals.

I have just returned from my most recent trip where I was very fortunate to travel to the US PGA Championship with our Chairman, Sandy Jones. Whilst there, we were able to share some of the golf development initiatives taking place across Europe for an interview with SiriusXM PGA TOUR Radio.

It would seem to me that there are some fantastic initiatives around the globe to encourage more people to play more golf more often and experience our wonderful sport. It would also seem that golf at the elite level could not be in a better place! The four men’s majors have been full of great golf, interesting story lines and excitement. Jason Day’s win at Whistling Straits (an amazing venue that is sure to provide a fitting stage when we return there for the Ryder Cup matches in 2020) saw him take his rightful place as a Major Champion after several near misses and he now joins Rory and Jordan in making up a triumvirate of twenty-somethings atop of the world rankings.

When you add in the fact that 17 year olds, in the form of Canadian, Brooke Henderson and Germany’s Dominic Foos (a member of the Junior Ryder Cup team in 2012), setting new records on the LPGA and European Challenge Tour respectively – the top of the professional games seems to be in a very exciting place!

I hope you enjoy the read this month and you are inspired by this issue to get out there and explore the golfing world.

This article originally featured in International Golf Pro News. Visit the IGPN Page to find out more and subscribe for free.

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Travel Broadens All Minds
Travelling & Communications http://www.pgae.com/ask/travelling-comms/ Tue, 15 Sep 2015 07:47:42 +0000 Aston Ward http://www.pgae.com/?p=12788 As Communications Manager for the PGAs of Europe I have been very lucky to visit a good number of our member countries for various events, tournaments and more.]]>

As Communications Manager for the PGAs of Europe I have been very lucky to visit a good number of our member countries for various events, tournaments and more.

A recent example was spending 10 days or so in Bulgaria at Pravets Golf & Spa Resort just outside Sofia. During that period we hosted around 50 people for various reasons tied into our education operations and I was lucky to spend much of the time interviewing these people and generating content.

During this trip and others before it I’ve picked up a few tips for travelling in a communications context that I think could easily help others heading to foreign climes:

Ask Questions

Never be afraid to ask a question – when I first visited countries outside of my ‘comfort zone’ (Britain), I always held back when I needed to find something out. I assumed people wouldn’t speak English and even if they did they wouldn’t want to help. Well it turns out, oddly enough, that they’re just like you and me. There are always people out there willing to help.

Asking questions also has other advantages – a whole world of culture and idiosyncrasies opens up to you and you often find out some enlightening things. This is especially important in what we do at the PGAs of Europe – you would be amazed at what you can find out when you ask the right questions and listen properly.

Learn Your Ps & Qs (phrases)

One of my only regrets is not having paid more attention in language lessons at school. Admittedly I am in an interesting position where we have 36 member countries that speak approximately 39 languages so it is more relevant to me than perhaps others, but I really wish I had at least one fluent second language. It is amazing to visit other countries and be able to speak to them in English and communicate effectively, but it would be better if the visitor could adapt to the host rather than the other way around [although something that can help is Google Translate’s amazing app that instantly translates printed text in 27 languages].

Because of this my advice is to try and learn just a couple of phrases and words that could help during the trip. Easier said than done of course but it is genuinely worth it. And don’t be afraid to test out your phrases when you are there. Again I’ve often hid away from using some snippets of languages I do know, but a) how will you get better if you don’t practice, and b) the natives don’t mind if it’s a little wrong…at least you are trying!

Organise Yourself

Always having documents to hand is great – I love to travel using Apple’s Passbook functions on the iPhone, but I always have backups somewhere in my hand luggage. And then I tend to have digital backups available offline in the app Evernote.

Then there’s your kit – more or less every time I travel for work I will have a bag of camera gear, computer bits and pieces and a mass of cables with me. The key here is to make sure your gear is secure and safe, easily accessible (especially for the times when you get a tear-down from security) and in its place. Amongst other things I use a ‘Cocoon GRID-IT!® – this is a great organisation system that uses elastic straps to hold anything and everything together so you can get to it easily and also keep a variety of items in one place.

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Backup! Backup! Backup!

The last tip (for now anyway) is to backup. That’s it. Simple. Always, always, always back your files up before you go anywhere. I have various hard drives and memory cards with me when I go away but I always have another back at home with a very recent backup ready to go if I ever need it. I haven’t needed it yet, but you never know…

This article originally featured in International Golf Pro News. Visit the IGPN Page to find out more and subscribe for free.

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Travelling & Communications
Sustainable Sport, Sustainable Business http://www.pgae.com/news/sustainable-sport-sustainable-business/ Sun, 28 Jun 2015 16:17:12 +0000 Ian Randell http://www.pgae.com/?p=12092 June's Issue of IGPN looks in depth at the future health of our sport and how the promotion of its benefits can be greatly assisted by taking a sustainable appr]]>

June’s Issue of IGPN looks in depth at the future health of our sport and how the promotion of its benefits can be greatly assisted by taking a sustainable approach to its development.

Growing the sport of golf in an environmentally, socially and economically sustainable way, aligns with, and contributes to, realising Europe’s 2020 Vision that enables us to influence government and EU policies and create more positive perceptions of our sport.

More people playing more golf more often has a positive impact on its economic contribution, a healthier population, and as long as this is done in an environmentally-friendly manner, then it is easy to promote golf’s benefit to society.

Here are just a few figures from various sources that highlight these positives:

  • Golf’s economic contribution to Europe is €15.1 billion
  • The sport employs approximately 400,000 people across Europe
  • There are proven health benefits such as golfers burning up to 800 calories per round, a reportedly 40% lower mortality rate and up to a five-year increase in life expectancy
  • Up to 70% of a well managed golf course can be used as habitat creation for wildlife
  • Golf courses, new or old, can enhance the local biodiversity of an area by providing a greater variety of habitats than intensively managed agricultural areas

There are a number of recent initiatives, such as Golf Europe’s ‘GoGolf!’ and the European Week of Sport, which are both about increasing participation in sport, and promoting the benefits of getting involved.

Further examples of the proactive steps being taken by golf can be seen through the work of GEO and the recent report on Ryder Cup’s Green Drive and how it has become one of the world’s leading sustainable events through a variety of activities that will really set the standards for events of any scale in the future.

The BMW PGA Championship is always a highlight on the European golf calendar and their environmental off-course work was hugely strong with their re-use initiative and the donation of materials to various projects and charities.

The PGA Championship week at Wentworth was also special for the PGAs of Europe as we began the celebrations of our 25th Anniversary year with a Business Club where we brought our Corporate Partners together under one roof. We take great pride in the longevity of many of our Partnerships and the loyalty that exists on both sides – a slightly different take on the word sustainable!

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Maintaining social, economic and environmental sustainability in golf and in golf’s businesses is something that should be high on everyone’s priority list and it is important that we promote its understanding and impact as much as we can! We would be delighted to hear of any examples of sustainability – feel free to email them to aw@pgae.com.

This article originally featured in International Golf Pro News. Visit the IGPN Page to find out more and subscribe for free.

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Sustainable Sport, Sustainable Business
Seize the Opportunities In Front of Us… http://www.pgae.com/ask/seize-the-opportunities-in-front-of-us/ Fri, 15 May 2015 14:07:59 +0000 Ian Randell http://www.pgae.com/?p=11394 Last month we focused on Golf Development and since then it has been a pleasure to be a part of initiatives and events that will undoubtedly aid our quest for d]]>

Last month we focused on Golf Development and since then it has been a pleasure to be a part of initiatives and events that will undoubtedly aid our quest for development of the game, supporting everything that we discussed in Issue 20 of IGPN.

I was invited along with representatives of a variety of golfing bodies to participate in the European Golf Federations’ Conference hosted by the European Tour at Wentworth where amongst other things we heard from the Czech Republic, Danish, French, and German Federations on some of the initiatives they were working on and that had been successful in their countries.

We also received an update on the progress of Golf in the Olympics and the role that it can play in the development of the sport in the coming years, along with a “Challenges Facing Europe” session.

Something we at the PGAs of Europe are particularly focused on is the development of ‘Golf Europe’ – a group of European golf stakeholders collaborating to grow golf and enhance the sport’s contribution to European society.

I joined representatives of the EGA, European Tour, LET and The R&A on a panel that introduced ‘Golf Europe’ and in particular ‘GoGolf’, an Erasmus+ funded initiative designed to engage young people in golf at a pan-European level and enhance the evidence base of the health benefits of golf.

The opportunities to grow the sport that lay in front of us, and future ‘Golf Europe’ initiatives that will be announced soon, must be seized and will surely prove to be hugely beneficial for our sport.

Also this month I was pleased to facilitate a more internal initiative between the CEOs of some of our larger Member Countries.  The first call of what will hopefully be a regular activity provided a platform for them to discuss current topics of interest and share successes and challenges that they face.  I am sure these calls will develop a lot to report in the future and I would encourage people to replicate the idea.

Meanwhile, the first Major of the year was full of excitement as professional golf welcomes a new era of emerging talent and sporting rivalries.

Whilst we all enjoyed seeing Tiger and Rory match up during the final round of The Masters, I must say the thought of a Rory McIlroy/Jordan Spieth rivalry in the future is an exciting prospect and certainly good for the sport as a whole as they each exude excellent qualities both as golfers and as people.  What a great advertisement for our sport!

And so to this month’s IGPN.  Themed around fitting and equipment, the issue explores a variety of aspects that fall within those categories, one such example being custom fitting.

As you will see in the piece later in this Issue from our Corporate Partners, PING, renowned as being at the forefront of custom fitting, there are many benefits for PGA Professionals.

But I think sometimes we sell ourselves short in terms of how important custom fitting is in helping golfers perform and also how useful it can be to a PGA Professional.  There are not many other sports where an almost infinite amount of specification can be made to one’s equipment – and perhaps no other sport where this type of customisation can have such a big impact on a person’s game.

PGA Professionals should always stress the importance of getting appropriately fitted equipment to their students and customers and really make the most of an opportunity to not only help make players better and enjoy themselves more, but also generate revenue.

IGPN is filled with ways to improve your understanding of fitting [in many senses of the word], along with how to capitalise on this knowledge to better aid your clients and customers, as well as your business.  Enjoy the read!

This article originally featured in International Golf Pro News. Visit the IGPN Page to find out more and subscribe for free.

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Seize the Opportunities In Front of Us…
“…People can often forget how much the game is giving back…” http://www.pgae.com/news/igpn-news/people-can-often-forget-how-much-the-game-is-giving-back/ Fri, 10 Apr 2015 15:12:11 +0000 Ian Randell http://www.pgae.com/?p=10730 I write this from Augusta, where the anticipation of the season’s first Major seems even greater than usual. How will Tiger fare after his self-imposed break fr]]>

I write this from Augusta, where the anticipation of the season’s first Major seems even greater than usual. How will Tiger fare after his self-imposed break from competition? Will Rory complete the “Slam” at just 25? Will Bubba continue to dominate Augusta or will we see another youngster in outstanding form, Jordan Spieth, complete his first Major victory? The storylines are captivating and we look forward to seeing it unfold.

I am very fortunate to be able to represent the PGAs of Europe, along with Board Member and Chief Executive of the PGA of Holland, Frank Kirsten, and join officials from PGAs, Federations, Tours and other golfing bodies from around the world for a week that provides a great deal of opportunity to speak with golfing colleagues on the varying issues affecting the game and initiatives to assist its development.

And this issue of IGPN focuses on exactly that…Golf Development.

Golf Development is at the very heart of the PGAs of Europe as we focus on advancing PGAs, advancing PGA Professionals and as a result advancing the enjoyment and playing standards of golfers and introducing many new potential golfers.

Last month I was pleased to be a part of GolfBIC (The Golf Business and Industry Convention) at the Forest of Arden in the UK not far from our Belfry Headquarters. The yearly gathering of British industry representatives was as insightful as ever and I enjoyed the back and forth with my fellow panel members during our discussions on key issues for the industry. Once again growing the game was at the forefront of discussions.

It is in just about every golf organisation’s interests to get more golfers playing more often and we are uniquely positioned to be able to share good practice across Europe and beyond through the network of some 21,000 PGA Professionals who make up the membership of our 36 Member Associations.

As the sole member of the Ryder Cup European Development Trust as well as being service providers to The R&A in their Working for Golf Programme, along with many other activities, the Association, its PGAs and the PGA Professionals they represent should be viewed as experts at the forefront of the development of our sport carrying out much of the development work for both amateur and professional bodies.

The Ryder Cup and Open Championship are just two great examples of this and they are joined on weekly basis by other initiatives and investment across the globe. Just this week it is great to see the addition of the ‘Drive, Chip & Putt Championship’ to the start of the Masters. Operated by the Masters Tournament, the PGA of America and the USGA, it is another fantastic example of organisations working together to promote the sport and create initiatives that continue to stimulate its growth.

Enjoy the issue and we would be delighted to hear of any golf development initiatives that you are involved in. Please contact Aston Ward on aw@pgae.com with these and we will feature the best initiatives over the coming issues.


This article originally featured in International Golf Pro News. Visit the IGPN Page to find out more and subscribe for free.

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“…People can often forget how much the game is giving back…”
“The Importance of Marketing Yourself & Your Business Properly…” http://www.pgae.com/news/igpn-news/the-importance-of-marketing-yourself-your-business-properly/ Tue, 17 Mar 2015 14:18:33 +0000 Ian Randell http://www.pgae.com/?p=10670 The first few months of the year have been very busy for us at the PGAs of Europe – our winter season is drawing to a close with the culmination of our early year tournaments, dates for upcoming events are being put in place, and preparations are being made for our 25th Anniversary celebrations later in the year.]]>

The first few months of the year have been very busy for us at the PGAs of Europe – our winter season is drawing to a close with the culmination of our early year tournaments, dates for upcoming events are being put in place, and preparations are being made for our 25th Anniversary celebrations later in the year.

I was lucky to be invited to South Africa earlier this month to spend time with the Chief Executive of the PGA of South Africa, Ivano Ficalbi, and his team. It was great to work with them on some details of their operation and to see first hand their work in the country.

A whistle-stop tour of the country took me to three cities in four days along with a stop at the World Club Pro-Am that was defended again by the PGA of Greece’s Henrik Engdahl. It’s been a pleasure to see the event grow in its two years and we’re looking forward to working closely with them on the 2016 edition next year.

Meanwhile this month our eyes have been drawn to the announcement of not one, but two Ryder Cup Captains in the form of Davis Love III for the USA Team and Northern Ireland’s Darren Clarke as the European Captain.

We have had the pleasure of Darren competing in the Beko Classic on several occasions and having left his mark on the Ryder Cup, including his fantastic efforts in 2006 at The K Club, we wish him every success in this latest chapter.

We should also take time to acknowledge the outstanding achievements of New Zealander Lydia Ko. To see an ascension from someone so young is incredible.

Back-to-back wins including her second home-win at the New Zealand Open are exemplary of what could easily become full-scale dominance of the ladies game. Lydia plans to retire when she reaches 30 – who knows what she’ll have achieved by then!

This month’s issue of IGPN focuses on marketing and PR and the ways in which PGA Professionals and golf facilities promote themselves and their products and engage with their clients.

Pretty much all of the things I have mentioned above involve marketing and PR – when you stop to think about it then marketing touches more elements of life than you would assume. The success of events, our Organisation’s work, and much more is dependent on the ability to provide value to sponsors, partners, and ultimately the end-user.

The communications side of the PGAs of Europe’s operations continues to be hugely important to the success of our endeavours and with an increasingly digital world, along with more and more discerning customers, marketing yourself and your business properly has never been more important.

This article originally featured in International Golf Pro News. Visit the IGPN Page to find out more and subscribe for free.

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“The Importance of Marketing Yourself & Your Business Properly…”